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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Anatomy > Tissues > Blood > Blood Cells > Red Blood Cells   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
IMMATURE RED BLOOD CELLS
ERYTHROBLASTS
VOLUME
RED BLOOD CELL
DISEASE
AUTOANTIBODIES
HEME
HEMOGLOBIN MOLECULE
MEAN CORPUSCULAR HEMOGLOBIN CONCENTRATION
MCH
THALASSEMIAS
THALASSEMIA
LOW RED BLOOD CELL COUNT
OXYGEN-CARRYING CAPACITY
VITAMIN
VITAMIN B-12
ERYTHROPOIESIS
RED CELLS
RETICULOCYTE COUNT
LUNGS
TRANSPORT OXYGEN
FATIGUE
RED BLOOD CELL COUNT
AUTOIMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA
COOMBS TEST
DEFICIENCY
PERNICIOUS ANEMIA
INHERITED DISEASE
ABNORMAL HEMOGLOBIN
RDW
MCHC
RBC COUNT
PCV
HEALTHY RED BLOOD CELLS
NORMAL NUMBER
HGB
OXYGEN-CARRYING
MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA
FOLIC
MATURE RED BLOOD CELLS
RED BONE MARROW
HEMOGLOBIN CONTENT
PACKED CELL VOLUME
MEAN CELL VOLUME
AVERAGE SIZE
PROTEINS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Red Blood Cells"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Red blood cells are the cells in the blood that carry oxygen from the lungs to the body tissues through blood pumped by the heart.
  2. Red blood cells are important because they carry oxygen through the bloodstream to the organs and cells of the body.
  3. Red blood cells are the most common type of cells in the blood, and are extremely important because they carry oxygen from the lungs to the body tissues.
  4. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to organs and tissues throughout the body. (Web site)
  5. Red blood cells are essential in transporting oxygen to all the cells in the body to serve their functions. (Web site)

Immature Red Blood Cells

  1. Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells produced by bone marrow and released into the bloodstream.
  2. A diagnosis of DBA is made on the basis of anemia, low reticulocyte (immature red blood cells) counts, and diminished erythroid precursors in bone marrow.

Erythroblasts

  1. Red blood cells originate in bone marrow as erythroblasts (a "blast" is a primitive cell that develops into a mature cell).
  2. Immature red blood cells (erythroblasts) produce hemoglobin as they mature into erythrocytes in the red bone marrow. (Web site)
  3. Individuals with this disorder are deficient in the number of precursors of red blood cells (erythroblasts).

Volume

  1. The mean corpuscular volume is the ratio of the volume of packed red blood cells in ml per liter of blood to red blood cells in millions per microliter. (Web site)
  2. Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. The hematocrit is a test that measures the volume of blood by the percentage that is comprised of red blood cells. (Web site)

Red Blood Cell

  1. To produce these red blood cells, your body will need iron to make hemoglobin, the part of the red blood cell that carries oxygen. (Web site)
  2. Consequently, overlap between red blood cells and white blood cells imparts minimal impact to the red blood cell or platelet counts. (Web site)

Disease

  1. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disease in which the bone marrow produces abnormal blood cells, including red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. It is a disease of the bone marrow in which too few platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells are made. (Web site)
  3. In addition, blood tests may show abnormalities in the numbers of red blood cells, white blood cells, and most commonly platelets, if the disease is present.

Autoantibodies

  1. The red blood cells are destroyed by antibodies produced by the patient's own body (autoantibodies).
  2. Autoantibodies reduce the life span of platelets, granulocytes, and red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. Destruction of red blood cells by autoantibodies may occur suddenly, or it may develop gradually. (Web site)

Heme

  1. When red blood cells die, the heme in their hemoglobin is converted to bilirubin in the spleen. (Web site)
  2. Red blood cells contain hemoglobin, which is broken down to heme and globin.
  3. Red blood cells consist of almost 90% hemoglobin; the heme is what gives blood its red color.

Hemoglobin Molecule

  1. In sickle cell anemia, a change in the hemoglobin molecule leads to the formation of crystals inside red blood cells.
  2. It is also essential for the formation of porphyrin, the pigment portion of the hemoglobin molecule of the red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. It is the breakdown product of the hemoglobin molecule of red blood cells.

Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration

  1. The mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, or MCHC, is a measure of the concentration of hemoglobin in a given volume of packed red blood cells.

Mch

  1. The MCH is calculated by dividing total hemoglobin by the total number of red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. The MCV, MCH, and MCHC reflect the size and hemoglobin content of individual red blood cells. (Web site)

Thalassemias

  1. People who have thalassemias have fewer healthy red blood cells and less hemoglobin in their blood than normal.
  2. Thalassemias cause the body to make fewer healthy red blood cells and less hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin) than normal.

Thalassemia

  1. Thalassemia (Mediterranean anemia) is an inherited blood disorder characterized by less hemoglobin and fewer red blood cells in your body than normal. (Web site)
  2. The low hemoglobin and fewer red blood cells of thalassemia may cause anemia, leaving you fatigued. (Web site)
  3. Thalassemia is an inherited blood disease characterized by the under production of normal hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. (Web site)

Low Red Blood Cell Count

  1. Too few red blood cells can mean not enough oxygen is carried to the body, according to the NIH. People who have a low red blood cell count often feel tired.
  2. Macrocytic anemia: Low red blood cell count, characterized by the presence in the blood of larger than normal red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. A sample of blood is taken to look for a low red blood cell count, low hemoglobin levels, small red blood cells, or an abnormal red blood cell structure. (Web site)

Oxygen-Carrying Capacity

  1. The hematocrit and hemoglobin tests indicate the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells.
  2. Folic acid can help lower homocysteine levels and increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells.

Vitamin

  1. Part of the vitamin B complex, folic acid is necessary for synthesis of nucleic acids and formation of the heme component of hemoglobin in red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Folic acid, a vitamin that helps the body produce new red blood cells, is often prescribed for teens with sickle cell anemia.
  3. Vitamin C affects blood vessels, skin, gums, connective tissue, red blood cells, wound healing, and the absorption of iron. (Web site)

Vitamin B-12

  1. Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B12 helps in the production of red blood cells needed by your body and in preventing anemia.
  2. Vitamin B-12. Your body needs vitamin B-12 to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. (Web site)
  3. Iron. Like vitamin B-12, iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. (Web site)

Erythropoiesis

  1. Cobalt, present in the body only in the form of vitamin B-12, is essential to erythropoiesis, or production of red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. It stimulates erythropoiesis (production of red blood cells) in the bone marrow. (Web site)
  3. Erythropoiesis is the process by which red blood cells (erythrocytes) are produced. (Web site)

Red Cells

  1. The low number of red cells causes a drop in hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to tissues of the body. (Web site)
  2. A hematocrit is the percentage of whole blood that is made up of red cells (about 99% of all blood cells are red blood cells).
  3. Some diseases and processes cause premature breakdown of red blood cells, leaving an abnormally small amount of red cells available for transporting oxygen.

Reticulocyte Count

  1. A reticulocyte count is a quantitative measure of the bone marrow 's production of new red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. First, obtain a reticulocyte count to determine whether there is decreased production or increased destruction of red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. A reticulocyte count is a blood test performed to assess the body's production of immature red blood cells (reticulocytes). (Web site)

Lungs

  1. Hemoglobin: haemoglobin is the part of the red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to all the parts of the body.
  2. Hemoglobin (HE-muh-GLOW-bun) the substance inside red blood cells that binds to oxygen and carries it from the lungs to the tissues.
  3. If blood oxygen levels are low, the body may over produce red blood cells in an attempt to pick up more oxygen from the lungs (polycythemia). (Web site)

Transport Oxygen

  1. Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, transport oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.
  2. The primary function of red blood cells is to transport oxygen from the lungs to the cells of the body.
  3. If the red blood cells fail to effectively transport oxygen throughout the body, anemia can result.

Fatigue

  1. A lack of red blood cells reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood and may cause fatigue, shortness of breath, palpitations.
  2. Red blood cells carry oxygen, and a shortage of those will cause fatigue and shortness of breath.
  3. Lack of red blood cells or erythrocytes can cause fatigue, body weakness, shortness of breath and skin paleness.

Red Blood Cell Count

  1. Tests looking at your red blood cells include red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. (Web site)
  2. Three tests (the Red Blood Cell Count, Total Hemoglobin Concentration and Hematocrit) measure the amount of red blood cells.
  3. Once the baby starts making new red blood cells, the red blood cell count gradually returns to normal.

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition in which the red blood cells that normally carry oxygen and carbon dioxide are destroyed by an autoimmune process.
  2. Some people with autoimmune hemolytic anemia may have no symptoms, especially when the destruction of red blood cells is mild and develops gradually. (Web site)
  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a disease in which the body attacks its own red blood cells.

Coombs Test

  1. If either alloimmunity or autoimmunity is directed against red blood cells (RBCs), the direct Coombs test is positive.
  2. The Coombs test is a test for antibody binding to red blood cells.
  3. The direct Coombs test is done on a sample of red blood cells from the body. (Web site)

Deficiency

  1. The presenting signs and symptoms of all forms of thalassemia is anemia (a deficiency of red blood cells) in varying degrees from mild to severe.
  2. Vitamin E deficiency may result in damage to red blood cells and destruction of nerves. (Web site)
  3. In adults, the signs and symptoms of vitamin E deficiency are muscle degeneration, breaking of red blood cells and infertility. (Web site)

Pernicious Anemia

  1. Pernicious Anemia (pur-NIH-shus uh-NEE-mee-uh) Anemia caused by a lack of vitamin B12. The body needs B12 to make red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood cells that occurs when the body cannot properly absorb vitamin B12 from the gastrointestinal tract. (Web site)
  3. Pernicious anemia: Pernicious anemia is a blood disorder where the body is unable to use it properly use Vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. (Web site)

Inherited Disease

  1. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease that changes the shape of the red blood cells produced by the body.
  2. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease of the red blood cells which causes abnormally shaped red cells.
  3. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease in which the red blood cells, normally disc-shaped, become crescent shaped.

Abnormal Hemoglobin

  1. A person with hemoglobin C disease has abnormal hemoglobin inside the red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Red blood cells that have abnormal hemoglobin are damaged or destroyed more easily than cells with normal hemoglobin. (Web site)
  3. Their red blood cells, containing some abnormal hemoglobin, tend to sickle when they are infected by the malaria parasite. (Web site)

Rdw

  1. Red cell distribution width (RDW) — A measure of the variation in size of red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Red cell distribution width (RDW) can also be measured which indicates different sizes of red blood cells are present.
  3. One hint that this kind of anemia may exist is a wide RBC distribution width (RDW), which suggests a wider-than-normal range of sizes of red blood cells. (Web site)

Mchc

  1. A similar measurement, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), expresses the average concentration of hemoglobin in the red blood cells.
  2. The MCH and MCHC reflect the hemoglobin content of red blood cells. (Web site)
  3. MCHC - is the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration which is a measurement of the average concentration of haemoglobin in red blood cells.

Rbc Count

  1. An RBC count is a blood test that tells how many red blood cells (RBCs) you have.
  2. The RBC count ranges from 4.2-5.0 million red blood cells per microliter of blood for women and 4.6-6.0 million for men.

Pcv

  1. The hematocrit (Ht) or packed cell volume (PCV) is the proportion of blood that is occupied by red blood cells.
  2. It can be calculated (in litres) by dividing the hematocrit (or PCV) by the red blood cell count (number of red blood cells per litre).

Healthy Red Blood Cells

  1. Anemia, one of the more common blood disorders, occurs when the level of healthy red blood cells (RBCs) in the body becomes too low.
  2. If the transplant is successful, new bone marrow cells will produce healthy red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. (Web site)
  3. Anemia is a condition where the number of healthy red blood cells (RBCs) in the blood is lower than normal. (Web site)

Normal Number

  1. Anemia is having less than the normal number of red blood cells or less hemoglobin than normal in the blood. (Web site)
  2. Anemia is a blood disorder in which the individual who has it has a lower than normal number of red blood cells in their blood. (Web site)
  3. If you have anemia, you have a lower than normal number of healthy red blood cells. (Web site)

Hgb

  1. Hemoglobin (Hgb) and Hematocrit (Hct): The hemoglobin is the amount of oxygen carrying protein contained within the red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Hemoglobin (Hgb) is the protein-iron compound in the red blood cells that enables them to transport oxygen.
  3. Anemia is a shortage of hemoglobin (HGB). HGB is a protein in red blood cells. (Web site)

Oxygen-Carrying

  1. Hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in the red blood cells) has to be present to ensure adequate oxygenation of all body tissues and organs. (Web site)
  2. Red blood cell indices are measurements that describe the size and oxygen-carrying protein (hemoglobin) content of red blood cells.
  3. All types of sickle cell disease are caused by a genetic change in hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein inside the red blood cells.

Megaloblastic Anemia

  1. Megaloblastic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by anemia, with red blood cells that are larger than normal.
  2. FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCY ANEMIA. Folic acid deficiency anemia is the most common type of megaloblastic anemia (in which red blood cells are bigger than normal).
  3. Megaloblastic anemia is characterized by enlarged and oval shaped red blood cells and is frequently caused by vitamin B 12 (cobalamin) or folate deficiency. (Web site)

Folic

  1. Lack of iron, vitamin B 12, or folic acid in the diet, as well as certain chronic diseases, lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow.
  2. Folate (folic acid) works with vitamin B-12 in the production of red blood cells.
  3. Your doctor may also give you a supplement of folic acid (a B vitamin) every day to help your body make new red blood cells. (Web site)

Mature Red Blood Cells

  1. The new red blood cells, called erythroblasts, are often immature and are not able to do the work of mature red blood cells.
  2. Reticulocytes develop and mature in the red bone marrow and then circulate for about a day in the blood stream before developing into mature red blood cells.
  3. Red blood cells, however, cannot be replaced quickly, as the bone marrow takes approximately ten days to produce mature red blood cells.

Red Bone Marrow

  1. In an earlier chapter, we discussed how the red bone marrow participates in the formation of red blood cells (RBCs) through the process of erythropoiesis.
  2. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. (Web site)
  3. Red bone marrow consists of myeloid tissue, red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells.

Hemoglobin Content

  1. Red blood cell indices are blood tests that provide information about the hemoglobin content and size of red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Hematocrit is a measure of the percent of red blood cells in the blood (plasma + RBC). So the more red blood cells the higher the hemoglobin content. (Web site)
  3. The CBC also measures the hemoglobin content (important to the transport of oxygen) and the packed cell volume (hematocrit)of the red blood cells.

Packed Cell Volume

  1. The hematocrit (Ht or HCT) and packed cell volume (PCV) are measures of the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells. (Web site)
  2. Hematocrit (HCT, packed cell volume, PCV). This test measures the amount of space (volume) red blood cells take up in the blood. (Web site)
  3. Packed cell volume (PCV) or haematocrit (Hct) is a measure of the percentage of red blood cells to the total blood volume. (Web site)

Mean Cell Volume

  1. Mean cell volume or mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is an estimate of the volume of red blood cells.
  2. The use of nonlytic hypertonic salt solution reduces the mean cell volume of the sample by reducing the particle size of the red blood cells. (Web site)

Average Size

  1. The mean cell volume is the name of a test that measures the average size (volume) of red blood cells.
  2. While the MCV measures the average size of red blood cells, the RDW (Red Blood Cell Distribution Width) measures the range of red blood cell sizes. (Web site)
  3. The mean cell volume measures the average size (volume) of red blood cells. (Web site)

Proteins

  1. Blood: The familiar red fluid in the body that contains white and red blood cells, platelets, proteins, and other elements.
  2. In the blood plasma, besides the (oxygen-carrying) red blood cells, there are also many proteins, which help the regeneration of the bone. (Web site)
  3. Red blood cells (RBCs) carry several types of proteins, called antigens, on their surfaces. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Anatomy > Tissues > Blood > Blood Cells
  2. Anatomy > Tissues > Blood > Hemoglobin
  3. Nature > Matter > Atoms > Oxygen
  4. Platelets
  5. Anatomy > Tissues > Blood > Anemia

Subcategories

Erythropoiesis

    Related Keywords

      * Anemia * Anemias * Antibodies * Blood * Bloodstream * Blood Cells * Body * Bone Marrow * Break * Breakdown * Causing Anemia * Cells * Decrease * Decreased Production * Destruction * Erythrocytes * Erythropoietin * Hemoglobin * Hemolysis * Hemolytic Anemia * Immune System * Iron * Low * Mcv * Mean Corpuscular Volume * Normal * Number * Oxygen * Plasma * Platelets * Polycythemia * Polycythemia Vera * Premature Destruction * Production * Rbc * Rbcs * Red * Red Blood Cells Break * Reticulocytes * Sickle Cell Anemia * Sickle Shape * Spleen * Tissues
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      Originally created: April 04, 2011.
      Links checked: June 17, 2013.
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