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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Awards > Dizzy Gillespie > Roy Eldridge   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
STYLE
INFLUENCE
SUCCESS
BANDS
SOLOIST
YOUNG MUSICIANS
GROUP
MILES DAVIS
VARIOUS BANDS
DIZZY
BILLIE HOLIDAY
DON BYAS
BEN WEBSTER
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
HOUSE BAND
BUCK CLAYTON
FADDIS
GILLESPIE
BARNEY KESSEL
PLAYING
ZOOT SIMS
PLAY
IDOL
TRUMPETER
TRUMPET
DRUMS
KRUPA
BAND
JAZZ
JAZZ GREATS
COLEMAN HAWKINS
LIONEL HAMPTON
DIZZY GILLESPIE
ROY ELDRIDGE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Roy Eldridge"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Roy Eldridge, the hottest trumpet player on the circuit since Louis and reigning champion on my playlist all the way up to Clifford Brown.
  2. Roy Eldridge was the stratospheric link between Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie.

Style

  1. Dizzy Gillespie was a trumpet virtuoso and gifted improviser, building on the style of Roy Eldridge but adding new layers of harmonic complexity.

Influence

  1. It was there that he came under the influence of and played with many old masters such as Roy Eldridge, Papa Jo Jones and Vic Dickenson.

Success

  1. Another success that year was the Jazz Giants '56 session with Roy Eldridge, trombonist Vic Dickenson and other swing-era artists.

Bands

  1. While still a teenager in Pittsburgh, Clarke played in the bands of Leroy Bradley and Roy Eldridge.

Soloist

  1. Trumpeter Roy Eldridge joins drummer Gene Krupa's orchestra as featured soloist.

Young Musicians

  1. Over several years it featured such major young musicians as Roy Eldridge, Bill Coleman, Frankie Newton and Dizzy Gillespie.

Group

  1. During this time, Roy Eldridge led Gene's band and eventually had to break up the group.

Miles Davis

  1. He's really right up there with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Lee Morgan, Roy Eldridge, an innovator and great composer," Lucoff said.

Various Bands

  1. Roy Eldridge played with various bands in that area, including Zack.

Dizzy

  1. The blowing is insane in spots -- in "Pop's Confessin," Dizzy tries to hit the loudest, highest, longest note possible ( la Roy Eldridge).

Billie Holiday

  1. While there he accompanied visiting musicians such as Roy Eldridge and Billie Holiday.
  2. Hentoff poignantly describes the early days of Roy Eldridge and the last years of Billie Holiday and Bird.

Don Byas

  1. In these and similar performances with visiting musicians, such as Don Byas, Roy Eldridge, and Helen Humes, Monk helped to formulate the emerging bop style.

Ben Webster

  1. Some of the other veterans appearing in this collection include Roy Eldridge, Vic Dickenson, Ben Webster, and Herb Ellis.

Louis Armstrong

  1. Davis was in a line of jazz trumpeters that started with Buddy Bolden and ran through Joe "King" Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge, and Dizzy Gillespie.
  2. Acres of monumental musicians played with Henderson's band -- Louis Armstrong, Ben Webster, Roy Eldridge -- and together they helped change popular music.

House Band

  1. Concurrently, he also led the house band at Jimmy Ryan's in New York City from 1980, directly following Roy Eldridge in this position.

Buck Clayton

  1. Initially influenced by Buck Clayton and Roy Eldridge he rapidly crosses over into bebop, following in the footsteps of Miles Davis and Fats Navarro.
  2. Adderley also admired musicians from other locales: Buck Clayton and Roy Eldridge, later Dizzy Gillespie.

Faddis

  1. Faddis evokes the voices of Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge, Miles Davis and of course Gillespie (no easy feat), all the while remaining true to his own.
  2. Faddis expanded his repertoire to include Roy Eldridge and Louis Armstrong, and his own great style.
  3. In fact, Faddis can now also imitate Roy Eldridge and Louis Armstrong quite well, too.

Gillespie

  1. Inspired and initially greatly influenced by Roy Eldridge, Gillespie (who soon gained the nickname of "Dizzy") joined Frankie Fairfax's band in Philadelphia.

Barney Kessel

  1. Youngish alto saxophonist Gordon is old enough to have once played with, yes, Red Rodney, Barney Kessel and even Roy Eldridge.

Playing

  1. He was born in 1917 and when he started playing, he copied Roy Eldridge, the highest and fastest trumpet player of the day.

Zoot Sims

  1. While they were in Paris, Wig also recorded two albums for a foreign record label, one with Zoot Sims and the other with Roy Eldridge.

Play

  1. He went on to play with Sid Catlett, Roy Eldridge, and Elmer Snowden before his career declined.

Idol

  1. From the night he heard his idol, Roy Eldridge, play on the radio, he dreamed of becoming a jazz musician.
  2. He joined Fletcher Henderson in 1936, replacing his idol, Roy Eldridge, and did exceptionally well in that demanding chair.

Trumpeter

  1. His first professional job was in Frankie Fairfax's band in Philadelphia; his early style showed the strong influences of his idol, trumpeter Roy Eldridge.
  2. Trumpeter Roy Eldridge later became part of the group, succeeding Billy Butterfield.
  3. Some of these recordings have been reissued in sets devoted to these instrumentalists, including trumpeter Roy Eldridge.

Trumpet

  1. He took up the trumpet when he was ten and was fortunate to have been exposed to recordings of Louis Armstrong and Roy Eldridge from an early age.

Drums

  1. Roy Eldridge started out playing trumpet and drums in carnival and circus bands.

Krupa

  1. Krupa's own big band is featured and highlights performances by Krupa, Roy Eldridge and Anita O'Day.
  2. In 1941, she joined Krupa's band, and a few weeks later Krupa hired trumpeter Roy Eldridge.

Band

  1. He became a member of Fletcher Henderson 's band and later replaced Roy Eldridge as soloist.
  2. He did not get the job but stayed in town and soon afterwards was hired for a European tour by Teddy Hill, in whose band he succeeded his idol, Roy Eldridge.

Jazz

  1. And from 1935 through 1939, he was regarded as the top trumpeter in jazz (with his main competition being Louis Armstrong and Roy Eldridge).
  2. The man who was known by the Forties for changing the definition of jazz was first known for being able to play like Roy Eldridge.
  3. Remember, this was 1947, and the big names of jazz were Roy Eldridge, Don Byas and Bill Harris.

Jazz Greats

  1. Archival film clips capture Krupa at his best accompanying other jazz greats such as Lionel Hampton, Roy Eldridge, and Benny Goodman.
  2. Shaw's bands in the 1930s and 1940s featured a who's who of jazz greats including Billie Holiday, Buddy Rich, Roy Eldridge and "Hot Lips" Page.
  3. In 1950 he toured Europe with a septet that included two other jazz greats, trumpeter Roy Eldridge and tenor saxophonist Zoot Sims.

Coleman Hawkins

  1. Coleman Hawkins on sax, Roy Eldridge on trumpet, Milt Hinton on bass, Johnny Guarnieri on piano, and Cozy Cole on drums.
  2. Other bands included the Chocolate Dandies, in which he played alongside Coleman Hawkins and Roy Eldridge, and the Varsity Seven.
  3. For several years, the 'other' band was co-led by Coleman Hawkins and Roy Eldridge.

Lionel Hampton

  1. There's his early work as a sideman with Teddy Hill and Lionel Hampton, when he was still under the sway of Roy Eldridge.
  2. This unit recorded with some of the finest talent in New York at the time, like Roy Eldridge, Lionel Hampton, Milt Jackson, Rex Stewart and many others.
  3. A child prodigy, by age 14 he was playing jazz piano professionally, with Lionel Hampton, Roy Eldridge, and Kenny Clarke.

Dizzy Gillespie

  1. Various leading jazzmen such as Charlie Parker, Roy Eldridge and Dizzy Gillespie played there with the Freeman's as the backing band.
  2. During that year he was also began playing with Roy Eldridge, through whom he met Dizzy Gillespie.
  3. Roy Eldridge in particular is often seen as a bridge between the traditional stylings of Louis Amrmstrong and the bebop of Dizzy Gillespie.

Roy Eldridge

  1. Gillespie first joined Frankie Fairfax, and made his recording debut in 1937 while filling for Roy Eldridge in Teddy Hill 's band.
  2. Tiny Grimes continued to lead his own groups into the later 1970's and he recorded with Coleman Hawkins, Illinois Jacquet and Roy Eldridge.
  3. In his playing, Gillespie built on the "saxophonic" style of Roy Eldridge and the harmonic complexity of Charlie Parker and then went far beyond Bird.

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Awards > Dizzy Gillespie
  2. Music > Jazz > Big Bands > Lionel Hampton
  3. Musical Instruments > Saxophones > Saxophonists > Coleman Hawkins
  4. Music > Musicians > Bandleaders > Louis Armstrong
  5. Jazz Greats
  6. Books about "Roy Eldridge" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Roy Eldridge"
  Originally created: March 23, 2007.
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