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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > World > Countries > United Kingdom > Scotland > Scots   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PALLADIUS
BANNOCKBURN
MINORITY LANGUAGES
MARGARET TUDOR
SCOTS MAKAR
SCOTS GREYS
LALLANS
CLASSIC SCOTS BALLADS
FRISIAN LANGUAGES
CROWN
CORONATIONS
ROYAL SCOTS REGIMENT
SCOTS WHA HAE
SCOTS REGIMENTS
SCOTS MUSICAL MUSEUM
ROYAL SCOTS NAVY
SCOTS LANGUAGE
SCOTS GUARDS
ROYAL SCOTS GREYS
ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS
LOWLAND SCOTS
ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS
SCOTS GAELIC
MARRIAGE
SCOTS LAW
ROYAL SCOTS
THOUGHT
CAMPAIGN
SEPTEMBER
ISSUE
LIST
BOOKS
OPERATING
UNION
CIVIL
THEMSELVES
PRACTICE
UNITED KINGDOM
MONEY
GREAT WAY
ALEXANDER
COUSIN
ARGENTINA
GERMANS
NAME
INFLUENCE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Scots"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Scots, a regional language of Scotland and Ireland, belongs to the same family of West Germanic languages as English. (Web site)
  2. Scots is spoken by some adjacent to the Anglo-Scottish Border, and Welsh is still spoken by some natives around Oswestry, Shropshire, on the Welsh border.
  3. Scots is spoken by around 1.5 million people in Scotland and 30,000 in Northern Ireland, where it is called Ulster Scots.
  4. Scots were indeed wise to agree in a referendum to re-establish the Scottish parliament. (Web site)
  5. Pound Scots was the national unit of currency in the Kingdom of Scotland before the country entered into a political and currency union with England in 1707.

Palladius

  1. The more certain in this case is the mission of Palladius in 431, and the condition of the Scots as already believers in Christ. (Web site)
  2. Prosper's testimony to the mission of Palladius as first bishop to the believing Scots. (Web site)

Bannockburn

  1. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. (Web site)

Minority Languages

  1. The British government now accepts Scots as a regional language and has recognised it as such under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. (Web site)

Margaret Tudor

  1. One possible line was that of Margaret Tudor, Henry VIII's elder sister, which led to Mary I, Queen of Scots. (Web site)

Scots Makar

  1. For example, in Anglo-Saxon a poet is a scop (shaper or maker) and in Scots makar.

Scots Greys

  1. Probably the best known painting of the gallant charge of the Royal North Dragoons, The Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo. (Web site)

Lallans

  1. In Ulster the neologism Ullans merging Ulster and Lallans is often used to refer to the revived literary variety of Ulster Scots.

Classic Scots Ballads

  1. Classic Scots Ballads was then reissued with the original notes to the songs by Ewan MacColl and new notes by Peggy Seeger.

Frisian Languages

  1. The closest undoubted living relatives of English are Scots and the Frisian languages.

Crown

  1. The Pict of Moray was obstinately hostile to the Scots, and his leaders and rulers aspired to, and claimed the crown of Scotland itself. (Web site)

Coronations

  1. It was subsequently used in the coronations of the child monarchs Mary, Queen of Scots in 1543 and her son James VI, King of Scots in 1567. (Web site)

Royal Scots Regiment

  1. In an attempt to prove himself to Charles, Desmond joins the Royal Scots Regiment of the British Army, only to end up in prison for failure to follow orders.

Scots Wha Hae

  1. Scots Wha Hae is stirringly martial — it is based on the tune played by Robert the Bruce's army before Bannockburn, but has no modern content.
  2. The Flower of Scotland, Scotland the Brave, and Scots Wha Hae among others, may be used on occasions that call for one.

Scots Regiments

  1. Okay? Andy says the English are not to blame Yuo're right - this thread is about the location of the Scots regiments.

Scots Musical Museum

  1. Information Lyrics This ballad was written by Robert Burns for the Scots Musical Museum whose volumes were published between 1787 and 1803. (Web site)
  2. The Scots Musical Museum was a major publication that had a pivotal role in the collecting and tradition of Music of Scotland. (Web site)

Royal Scots Navy

  1. Under the Acts of Union in 1707 the Royal Scots Navy merged with the English Navy and the modern Royal Navy came into being.
  2. The Red Ensign was also flown by ships of the Royal Scots Navy, with a Saltire in the canton. (Web site)

Scots Language

  1. Both Robert Burns and Robert Louis Stevenson used it to refer to the Scots language.
  2. This is a feature that it shares with Scots language, and may have influenced, the suffixes "-ag" and "-ock" in that language. (Web site)

Scots Guards

  1. He was commissioned into the Scots Guards, an elite regiment which shared the ceremonial duty of guarding the Queen in London.

Royal Scots Greys

  1. A former Captain in the Royal Scots Greys, he was Equerry to the late King George VI from 1950-1952, and to The Queen from 1952-1954.

Royal Scots Dragoon Guards

  1. The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards have an eagle on their cap badge to commemorate the capture of a French Imperial Eagle at Waterloo by the Royal Scots Greys.
  2. The Standard of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards is of crimson damask silk and features 50 of the Regiment's numerous battle honours.

Lowland Scots

  1. The local dialect of Lowland Scots is often known as the Doric, and is spoken not just in the city, but across the north-east of Scotland.
  2. The elision of medial consonants, so marked in these Marquesan instances, is no less common both in Gaelic and the Lowland Scots.

Royal Scots Fusiliers

  1. Earl of Mar's Fusiliers see " Royal Scots Fusiliers " Earthwork An earthwork is a military fortification formed chiefly of earth.
  2. The regiment celebrated its 300th anniversary, inherited from the Royal Scots Fusiliers, at Redford Barracks, Edinburgh in 1978. (Web site)
  3. Researchers should also note we have no connection with either the Royal Scots Fusiliers, The Royal Scots Greys or the Royal Scots Guards.

Scots Gaelic

  1. It is from this that the city derives its name; Inbhir Nis is Scots Gaelic for "mouth of the Nis ". (Web site)

Marriage

  1. A Hamilton was heir to the Scottish throne and arranged the marriage between Mary Queen of Scots and the Dauphin of France.

Scots Law

  1. In Scots law " multiplepoinding " is the equivalent of "interpleader." Ireland. (Web site)
  2. Under Scots law, there were several forms of "irregular marriage" (including marriage by correspondence), but all but one of them was abolished by 1947.

Royal Scots

  1. The Royal Scots: history and handbook of the regiment, 1633-1954.
  2. In the two days fighting, the exhibition of these qualities had cost the Royal Scots a loss of 360 officers and men killed and wounded. (Web site)

Thought

  1. To be slightly acerbic, I love Scotland and I thought the Scots loved Scotland. (Web site)

Campaign

  1. The Roman co-emperor Constantius Chlorus dies July 25 at age 56 outside Eboracum (later York) during a campaign against the Picts and Scots.

September

  1. At the Battle of Flodden on September 9, 1513, the Scots were completely and totally defeated. (Web site)
  2. This well liked Hal Wallis production starring Genevieve Bujold will debut from Universal on September 18, alongside 1973's Mary, Queen of Scots. (Web site)

Issue

  1. But Jackie Baillie, the Labour MSP for Dumbarton, argued Scots had had their say on the issue at last year's general election.
  2. And some of the comments here on the issue of the location of Scots regiments reflect this bigotry.

List

  1. It does list a number of interesting sounding books: Scots is not slang. (Web site)

Books

  1. Recommended reading ------------------- There are two books that are essential reading on the subject of Scots. (Web site)
  2. In 1787, he began collecting and editing songs for a series of books entitled, The Scots Musical Museum. (Web site)

Operating

  1. Scots and French privateers were operating around Wales throughout Owain’s war. (Web site)

Union

  1. Scotland had its own currency, the pound Scots, prior to the Act of Union in 1707.
  2. David was succeeded by the ineffective Malcolm IV, and then by William the Lion, the longest-reigning King of Scots before the Union of the Crowns.
  3. Under the Acts of Union in 1707 the Royal Scots Navy then numbering just three ships, merged with that of England to create a British Royal Navy.

Civil

  1. Scots law provides for three types of courts responsible for the administration of justice in Scotland: civil, criminal and heraldic.

Themselves

  1. My own ancestors would have considered themselves to be Anglo-Irish, yet there were Scots, English and even French members.

Practice

  1. In practice, however, the Royal Assent is always granted; the last monarch to withhold Assent was Anne, who rejected a Scots militia bill in 1708.

United Kingdom

  1. Scotland and the Scots are no less a valuable part of the United Kingdom than any other.

Money

  1. The Pound Scots, and the more common Merk of two thirds of a Pound Scots, continued to be used in Scotland as money of account for most of the 18th century.

Great Way

  1. This is a great way to promote new songs in Gaelic and Scots.
  2. The Army Cadet Force is a great way to find out more about the Scots Guards and it is a great way to meet new friends.

Alexander

  1. Alexander "Sawney" Bean (or Beane), Sawny is Scots for Sandy - was the legendary patron head of a cannibalistic family in Scotland in the 15th century.

Cousin

  1. Shinty (also called camanachd or iomain in Scots Gaelic) is a stick and ball game, a cousin of Field Hockey and Hurling, and an ancestor of Golf.

Argentina

  1. There are some other minority languages of the Scottish people, such as Spanish, used by the population of Scots in Argentina.
  2. Other step dances include Tap, Clogging, Canadian step dance, Cape Breton step dance, some forms of Scots and English folk dance and Malambo from Argentina.

Germans

  1. In 1781 Pittsburgh was a village of 400 inhabitants, most Scots, like himself, Scots-Irish, and Germans. (Web site)
  2. Outnumbering the English emigrants, the 100,000 Germans were second only to the Scots as eighteenth-century immigrants to British America.

Name

  1. Among the earliest were John I de Balliol, father of the future King of Scots; Balliol College bears his name.
  2. He established the Dal Riada which was the name for this conglomeration of Irish, Scots and Picts. (Web site)
  3. Fotheringay, by the way, was the name of the English castle where Mary, queen of Scots was imprisoned.

Influence

  1. Lowland Scots continues to heavily influence the spoken English of the Scottish people today.

Categories

  1. World > Countries > United Kingdom > Scotland
  2. Countries > Ireland > Northern Ireland > Ulster
  3. Queen
  4. English
  5. Gaelic

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  Short phrases about "Scots"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: February 28, 2013.
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