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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Politics > Government > Empires > Emperors > Shah Jahan   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MUMTAZ MAHAL
CAMPAIGNS
WIFE
RED FORT
MALIK AMBAR
SON AURANGZEB
KHURRAM SHAH
MUGHAL EMPIRE
DARA
WANING YEARS
ILL
MUGHALS HAD
JAHAN DIED
ASSIGNING AUTHORITY
JAHANGIR
UNDER HOUSE ARREST
GOLCONDA
PRINCE
DECCAN
MUGHAL EMPEROR
DECLARED HIMSELF EMPEROR
THRONE
TAJ MAHAL
GRANDFATHER
SHAH JAHAN
END
JAHANARA
SUZERAINTY
MUMTAZ
FAMOUS KOH-I-NOOR DIAMOND
BADSHAHNAMA
KASIM KHAN
MASSIVE FORT
BELOVED WIFE MUMTAZ MAHAL
SHALIMAR GARDENS
WIFE MUMTAZ MAHAL
PRINCE KHURRAM
OCCASIONS
TITLE
BROTHERS
RULER
RULE
ILLNESS
REVOLT
STRUGGLE
ORDERS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Shah Jahan"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Shah Jahan was the person, who was master mind behind the construction of Taj Mahal, one of the 7 wonders of the world. (Web site)
  2. Shah Jahan was the third son of the emperor Jahangir and a grandson of the emperor Akbar. (Web site)
  3. Shah Jahan was deposed and imprisoned in the palace fort of Agra where he died in 1666 (eight years later). (Web site)
  4. Shah Jahan was overthrown by his son, Aurangazeb, who orchestrated the death and murder of his three brothers. (Web site)
  5. Shah Jahan was at the pinnacle of his prowess, he had destroyed the Nizam Shah and defeated the Portuguese. (Web site)

Mumtaz Mahal

  1. Agra's Taj Mahal is one of the most famous buildings in the world, the mausoleum of Shah Jahan's favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. (Web site)
  2. It was built by the fifth Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan in 1631 in memory of his second wife, Mumtaz Mahal, a Muslim Persian princess. (Web site)
  3. The main chamber houses the cenotaphs of Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan with the actual graves located a level below. (Web site)
  4. In 1631, Shah Jahan, emperor during the Mughal empire's period of greatest prosperity, was griefstricken when his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal died.
  5. She could have little influence over the willful Shah Jahan or her niece Mumtaz Mahal. (Web site)

Campaigns

  1. Shah Jahan---s earlier years were spent in doing his father---s bidding in various campaigns and territorial expansion.
  2. Shah Jahan's military campaigns drained the imperial treasury. (Web site)

Wife

  1. The true story never ends even when Shah Jahan was buried next to his wife after his death.
  2. The world-famous Taj Mahal was built in Agra during Shah Jahan's reign as a tomb for his beloved wife, Mumtaz Mahal. (Web site)
  3. Prince Khurram gave himself the title of Shah Jahan, the ---King of the World--- and this was the name that was immortalized by history.
  4. Shah Jahan commissioned the famous Taj Mahal ( 1630 --- 1653) in Agra as a tomb for his wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth to their 14th child.
  5. Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan got this monument constructed in the memory of his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal, with whom he fell in love at the first sight. (Web site)

Red Fort

  1. It is also said that he had the window of the Red Fort from where Shah Jahan would look at the resting place of his beloved Mutaz Mahal---the Taj Mahal.
  2. The basis of what is today Old Delhi, including the Red Fort and the Jama Masjid, was built during the reign of the Moghul emperor Shah Jahan (1628-1658). (Web site)
  3. Take a half-day city tour of Old Delhi and visit places like Jama Masjid, the largest mosque in India and the Red Fort built by Shah Jahan. (Web site)
  4. Shah Jahan shifted his capital from Agra to Shahjahanabad and laid the foundation of Red Fort, or the Lal Quila, on 16th April 1639. (Web site)
  5. The Diwan-E-Am used to house the famous Peacock Throne, which was taken to the Red Fort when Shah Jahan moved his capital to Delhi.

Malik Ambar

  1. Imperial armies sent by Dara and Shah Jahan soon restrained this effort, and Shuja retreated.
  2. Shah Jahan dismissed him as the governor of Deccan.
  3. This alarmed Shah Jahan and with the help of his father-in-law and Malik Ambar he was able to muscle his way into Delhi and pronounce himself the emperor. (Web site)

Son Aurangzeb

  1. Overthrown by his son Aurangzeb, Shah Jahan was imprisoned in the Octagonal Tower of the Agra Fort. (Web site)
  2. Shah Jahan would recover from his illness only to spend his last days as an old and decrepit man, imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb, in the fort in Agra. (Web site)
  3. His son Aurangzeb led a rebellion when Shah Jahan became ill in 1657 CE (1067 AH) and publicly executed his brother and the heir apparent Dara Shikoh. (Web site)
  4. Layout Inside the Musamman Burj, where Shah Jahan spent the last seven years of his life under house arrest by his son Aurangzeb. (Web site)
  5. Shah Jahan would recover from his illness only to spend his last days as an old and decrepit man, imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb, in the fort in Agra.

Khurram Shah

  1. Jahangir, the laid back emperor died in 1627 from alcohol abuse and Prince Khurram---Shah Jahan---s reign as the emperor began.
  2. Jahangir claimed the victories of Khurram --- Shah Jahan as his own.
  3. In 1622, Khurram ( Shah Jahan), younger brother of Khusrau, in a conspiracy to eliminate all possible contenders to the throne had Khusrau murdered.

Mughal Empire

  1. After his father Shah Jahan completes the Taj Mahal, his son Aurangzeb deposes him as ruler of the Mughal Empire.
  2. It was known then as Akbarabad and remained the capital of the Mughal Empire under Emperor Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan. (Web site)
  3. Shah Jahan left behind the colossal monuments of the Mughal empire though he spent much of his time subduing Hindu kingdoms to the south. (Web site)
  4. It was known then as Akbarabad and remained the capital of the Mughal Empire under Emperor Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan. (Web site)
  5. The old city served as the capital of the later Mughal Empire from 1638 onwards, when Shah Jahan transferred the capital back from Agra.

Dara

  1. During this second viceroyalty his relations with his eldest brother, Dara Shukoh, who was Emperor Shah Jahan's principal adviser, deteriorated. (Web site)
  2. Shah Jahan, determined that Dara would succeed him, handed over control of his empire to Dara.
  3. She was trying to prop up her own son-in-law, a brother of Shah Jahan as the legal heir. (Web site)
  4. A large mosque attributed to Princess Jahanara Begum, built in 1648 during the reign of the father Shah Jahan.
  5. The fate of Shah Jahan was sealed when the eldest prince, Dara Shukoh, suffered defeat at Samugarh at the hands of Awrungzeyb and Murad Bukhsh. (Web site)

Waning Years

  1. In September of 1657, Shah Jahan, in his waning years, suffered from acute constipation and rumours of his imminent death spread rapidly through the land.
  2. The bereaved Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, had no desire to live except to see a mausoleum built, as afitting tribute to her extraordinary beauty. (Web site)
  3. In September of 1657, Shah Jahan, in his waning years, suffered from acute constipation and rumors of his imminent death spread rapidly through the land. (Web site)

Ill

  1. Shah Jahan fell ill in 1657, and was widely reported to have died.
  2. September - Shah Jahan becomes ill, allowing his son to take control.
  3. In 1657, when Shah Jahan fell ill, the contenders for the throne, four brothers stirred with impatience and Aurangzeb became the eventual winner. (Web site)
  4. His son Aurangzeb led a rebellion when Shah Jahan became ill in 1657 CE (1067 AH) and publicly executed his brother and the heir apparent Dara Shikoh.
  5. Shah Jahan fell ill and was imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb, who became the new Mughal emperor. (Web site)

Mughals Had

  1. The opulence of the Mughals had reached its pinnacle during Jahangir and Shah Jahan---s rule, thanks to Akbar---s foresight.
  2. When the Mughals had partial success in 1616, Prince Khurram was rewarded by Jahangir with the title of Shah Jahan ("King of the World"). (Web site)

Jahan Died

  1. Shah Jahan died in the year 1666, at age seventy-four, eight years after losing his throne to his son. (Web site)
  2. At least on paper Shah Jahan---s empire had extended deep into the south in Deccan and beyond.
  3. It is rumored that Shah Jahan died in Muasamman Burj, a tower with a marble balcony with an excellent view of the Taj Mahal.
  4. Shah Jahan's tomb was erected next to hers by his son Aurangzeb. (Web site)
  5. It was commissioned by the Mugal Emperor Shah Jahan as a mausoleum for his Persian wife, Arjumand Banu Begum, also known as Mumtaz-ul-Zamani.

Assigning Authority

  1. Shah Jahan followed the Mughal practice of assigning authority to his sons, and in 1634 made Aurangzeb Subahdar (governor) of the Deccan.
  2. Both times, Shah Jahan called off the attacks near the moment of Aurangzeb's triumph.
  3. This delay allowed Aurangzeb to win over the Mughal general, Kasim Khan, who was sent by Shah Jahan to help Jaswant Singh. (Web site)
  4. The great Mughals Babur, Humayun, Akbar, Jehangir, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb lived here, and the country was governed from here.
  5. Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb extracted a larger land revenue than the British do. (Web site)

Jahangir

  1. In 1605, Akbar was succeed by his son Jahangir, who passed the expanding empire along to his own son Shah Jahan in 1627. (Web site)
  2. The city was restored to its glory in 1638 when the son of Jahangir, Shah Jahan, laid the foundations of the seventh city of Delhi, Shahjahanabad. (Web site)
  3. When Jahangir died, Asaf Khan took the side of his son-in-law Shah Jahan against his sister. (Web site)
  4. Son of Jahangir and grandson of Akbar - the greatest Mughal Emperor, Shah Jahan became ruler in 1627 at the age of 35 years.
  5. The city was restored to its glory in 1638 when the son of Jahangir, Shah Jahan, laid the foundations of the seventh city of Delhi, Shahjahanabad. (Web site)

Under House Arrest

  1. With his succession secured, Aurangzeb kept Shah Jahan under house arrest at the Red Fort in Agra.
  2. Layout Inside the Musamman Burj, where Shah Jahan spent the last seven years of his life under house arrest by his son Aurangzeb.

Golconda

  1. In the time of Shah Jahan, the Deccan had been controlled by three Muslim kingdoms: Ahmednagar, Bijapur and Golconda.
  2. Aurangzeb under the command from Shah Jahan took over Hyderabad by surprise and restricted Abdullah within the Golconda fort.
  3. Abdullah Qutb Shah of Golconda formally recognized the suzerainty of Shah Jahan but the king of Bijapur was not ready to barter away his independence.

Prince

  1. Even at the time it was believed that the withdrawals had actually been ordered by Prince Dara, in Shah Jahan's name.
  2. Jahangir's son Prince Khurram ascended the throne in 1628 as Emperor Shah Jahan.
  3. He considered his third son Prince Khurram (future Shah Jahan---born 1592 of Hindu Rajput princess Manmati), his favourite. (Web site)
  4. Nur Jehan 's abortive efforts to secure the throne for the prince of her choice led Shah Jahan to rebel in 1622.
  5. Shah Jahan had doctors and fakirs brought to his palace, from all corners of the country, but no one could come up with a remedy to cure the prince. (Web site)

Deccan

  1. In Deccan, Shah Jahan at first had defeats at the hands of an African habshi (Negro) slave from Baghdad, named Malik Ambar, who served the Bijapur sultan.
  2. In Deccan, Shah Jahan had initial failures in the hands of an African habshi (Negro) slave from Baghdad, a Malik Ambar, who was under the Bijapur sultan. (Web site)
  3. Some success was at hand in the Deccan when an African slave, Malik Ambar, brought from Baghdad, serving under the sultante of Ahmadnagar, helped Shah Jahan.

Mughal Emperor

  1. It was one of the Deccan sultanates, which lasted until its conquest by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in 1636.
  2. The Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan (1628-1658) was the richest and most powerful monarch on earth. (Web site)
  3. Soon after, Shuja's youngest brother Murad Baksh Murad Baksh (died 1658) was the youngest son of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and empress Mumtaz Mahal.
  4. The Taj Mahal is a mausoleum located in Agra, India, built by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in memory of his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. (Web site)
  5. The monument was built in Agra, India, for Mumtaz Mahal, the favorite wife of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.

Declared Himself Emperor

  1. When Shah Jahan supposedly died, his second son, Shah Shuja (Mughal) declared himself emperor in Bengal.
  2. On news of the Shah Jahan's supposed death, his second son, Shah Shuja declared himself emperor in Bengal.

Throne

  1. Later, however, he joined Shah Jahan and helped him quell the threat from his brothers who had aspirations to conquer the throne. (Web site)
  2. Prince Khurram, who would later be known as Emperor Shah Jahan, ascended to the throne after a tumultuous succession battle worthy of a Mughal Prince.
  3. A wretched youth, Shah Jahan II was made to occupy the throne after the murder of Farrukhsiyar but his rule lasted only three months. (Web site)
  4. Malik Ambar assisted Shah Jahan wrestle power in Delhi from his stepmother, Nur Jahan, who had ambitions of seating her son-in-law on the throne. (Web site)
  5. Nur Jahan's abortive efforts to secure the throne for the prince of her choice led Shah Jahan to rebel against Jahangir in 1622.

Taj Mahal

  1. Agra's Taj Mahal is one of the most famous buildings in the world, the mausoleum of Shah Jahan's favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal.
  2. Shah Jahan also built or renovated forts in Delhi and in Agra. (Web site)
  3. In the fratricidal war of succession that closed the reign of Akbar's grandson Shah Jahan in 1658.
  4. The most splendid of the Mogul tombs, and the most renowned building in India, is the Taj Mahal at Agra, the tomb of Mumtaz Mahal, the wife of Shah Jahan. (Web site)
  5. On both occasions, the loyal hakims took the cup to Shah Jahan but themselves drank the poison.

Grandfather

  1. Unlike his grandfather, Shah Jahan tended to have buildings made from white marble, often inlaid with gold or semi-precious gems.
  2. Thanks to the firm base left by his grandfather and father, Shah Jahan's reign was relatively peaceful and hence prosperous.
  3. Like his grandfather, Akbar the Great, Shah Jahan was passionate about architecture. (Web site)
  4. His grandfather, Sheikh Wajihuddin, was an important officer in the army of Shah Jahan who supported Prince Aurangzeb in the war of succession. (Web site)

Shah Jahan

  1. Legends about the cruelty of this execution abound, including stories that Aurangzeb had Dara's severed head sent to the dying Shah Jahan.
  2. In the Mughal court, however, Shah Jahan began to show greater and greater favoritism to his eldest son Dara Shikoh.
  3. The red sandstone fort was renovated and converted into a palace during Shah Jahan's time, and reworked extensively with marble and pietra dura inlay. (Web site)
  4. Shah Jahan also moved the capital to Delhi during his reign, but his son moved it back to Akbarabad where he imprisoned his father in the Red Fort.
  5. Apart from Taj Mahal, Shah Jahan also built a number of other great buildings in Delhi and Agra, including Jama Masjid of Delhi, the largest mosque in India.

End

  1. On one end of Chandni Chowk is the Fatehpuri Mosque which was erected by the wives of Shah Jahan. (Web site)

Jahanara

  1. The shrine also has the tomb of Amir Khusru and the grave of Jahanara, the daughter of Shah Jahan. (Web site)

Suzerainty

  1. Earlier Tana Shah's father-in-law Abdullah Qutb Shah was forced by Aurangzeb to acknowledged the suzerainty of Shah Jahan.

Mumtaz

  1. The main chamber houses the cenotaphs of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz (the actual graves are a level below).
  2. The inner chamber of the Taj Mahal contains the cenotaphs of Mumtaz and Shah Jahan. (Web site)
  3. The main chamber houses the cenotaph s of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz (the actual graves are a level below). (Web site)

Famous Koh-I-Noor Diamond

  1. Shah Jahan had the famous Koh-i-noor diamond placed in this throne. (Web site)

Badshahnama

  1. So, the logical conclusion is that, the said gigantic construction never took place during the reign of Shah Jahan and Badshahnama confirms this fact. (Web site)
  2. Badshahnama, one of the most important court journals of Shah Jahan, deals with the burial of Mumtaz in two pages of its first volume (pp.403-404). (Web site)

Kasim Khan

  1. This delay allowed Aurangzeb to win over the mughal general, Kasim Khan, who was sent by Shah Jahan to help Jaswant. (Web site)

Massive Fort

  1. Construction of this massive fort was started by Akbar in 1565 and additions were made right through the time of his grandson, Shah Jahan.
  2. Shah Jahan started construction of the massive fort in 1638 and it was completed in 1648.

Beloved Wife Mumtaz Mahal

  1. Entry to the 17th century monument of love build by Shah Jahan for his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal is free from 2 p.m. (Web site)

Shalimar Gardens

  1. Notable structures associated with Shah Jahan The Shalimar Gardens, comprising over four-hundred fountains, were built by the Mughal emperor.

Wife Mumtaz Mahal

  1. Shah Jahan gave Agra its most prized monument, The Taj Mahal, in loving memory of his wife Mumtaz Mahal, in 1643.
  2. The highlight of the Day - The Taj Mahal, which was constructed by Shah Jahan in memory of his wife Mumtaz Mahal.

Prince Khurram

  1. Shah Jahan, earlier named Prince Khurram ascended the throne in 1627 after the death of his father Jahangir at the age of 35. (Web site)

Occasions

  1. On both occasions, the loyal hakims took the cup to Shah Jahan but themselves drank the poision.

Title

  1. It was at this time that he received the title of Shah Jahan from the emperor.
  2. Shah Jahan was driven from the throne in 1658 by his son Aurangzeb, who took the title of Alamgir ("Conqueror of the World"). (Web site)
  3. The architect of the Taj Mahal was Ustad Ahmad, a native of Lahore who was awarded the title of "Nadir-ul Asr" (Wonder of the Age) by Shah Jahan. (Web site)

Brothers

  1. When Shah Jahan fell ill in 1658, Aurangzeb seized the opportunity to fight and defeat Dara and two other brothers in a battle for succession. (Web site)
  2. Dara conducted Shah Jahan and his brothers to see how the room looked. (Web site)

Ruler

  1. Shah Jahan ("Ruler of the World") inherited a near bankrupt empire from his father Jahangir.
  2. Shah Jahan himself favored Dara Shikoh to become the ruler of Mughal India.

Rule

  1. Shah Jahan came to power in 1622 when he seized the throne from his father, while murdering his brothers to ensure his claim to rule.
  2. The Mughal Empire attained its peak of cultural splendor under the rule of Shah Jahan, grandson of Akbar. (Web site)
  3. The golden rays which seemed to be fading at the end of Shah Jahan’s rule were brightened to a large extent by Aurangzeb in his initial years.

Illness

  1. The illness of Shah Jahan in 1657 precipitated a flurry of activities amongst his four sons who considered themselves contenders to the throne. (Web site)

Revolt

  1. The revolt of Khan Jahan Lodi in 1628 gave much more trouble to Shah Jahan than the Bundela rising.

Struggle

  1. When the fifth great Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan fell severely ill beginning in 1657, the struggle for succession began like many others before it.
  2. Decline and fall When Shah Jahan fell severely ill beginning in 1657, the struggle to succeed him began.

Orders

  1. Copies of orders (farmans) issued to Raja Jai Singh, for the purpose by Shah Jahan, can be seen in the Taj Museum. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Politics > Government > Empires > Emperors
  2. Shimla Tour > India
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Family > Son
  4. Succession
  5. House Arrest

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  Short phrases about "Shah Jahan"
  Originally created: March 04, 2008.
  Links checked: February 27, 2013.
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