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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Fat Malabsorption > Steatorrhea   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
DIETARY THERAPY
MALABSORBED
PANCREATOGENIC STEATORRHEA
JAPANESE
PATIENT
LEADING
TESTS
EXCESSIVE
PRESENCE
STUDY
TREATING
HALLMARK
ADVANCED STAGE
TREATMENT
PEOPLE
LOOSE
STOOL
CYSTIC FIBROSIS
FAT ABSORPTION
COMMON
METABOLIC BONE DISEASE
NORMAL DIGESTION
HIGH FAT CONTENT
FATTY STOOLS
RESULT
ABDOMINAL BLOATING
WEIGHT
FECES
DISEASE
BULKY
PATIENTS
CHRONIC PANCREATITIS
DIARRHEA
STOOLS
GREASY
FATS
FAT
PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY
FAT-SOLUBLE VITAMINS
MALABSORPTION
FAT MALABSORPTION
STEATORRHEA
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Steatorrhea"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Steatorrhea (excess fat in stools) is common, and glucose absorption is impaired.
  2. Steatorrhea is a sticky type of diarrhea, where lipids are malabsorbed and spill into the stool. (Web site)
  3. Steatorrhea (or steatorrhoea) is the presence of excess fat in feces. (Web site)
  4. Steatorrhea (or steatorrhoea) is the formation of bulky, grey or light colored stools. (Web site)
  5. Steatorrhea is suspected when the patient has large, "greasy", and foul-smelling stools. (Web site)

Dietary Therapy

  1. The dietary therapy of steatorrhea requires knowledge of the cause of the disease associated with the steatorrhea. (Web site)

Malabsorbed

  1. D-xylose and vitamin B12 were malabsorbed in all cases; steatorrhea was found in the two patients who could ingest significant amounts of fat.

Pancreatogenic Steatorrhea

  1. Ebert R, Creutzfeldt W. Reversal of impaired GIP and insulin secretion in patients with pancreatogenic steatorrhea following enzyme substitution. (Web site)

Japanese

  1. The incidence of steatorrhea is said to be lower and its grade milder in Japanese because their fat intake is lower than that of Europeans and Americans.

Patient

  1. Emphasis is placed on the fact that each patient must be managed by correlating the cause of the steatorrhea with specific modalities of therapy. (Web site)

Leading

  1. Increased gastrin secretion increases gastric acid, which may inactivate pancreatic lipase, leading to diarrhea and steatorrhea.

Tests

  1. Tests for steatorrhea: The qualitative Sudan stain is specific for dietary triglycerides and lipolytic metabolites.

Excessive

  1. Steatorrhea —An excessive amount of fat in the feces due to poor fat absorption in the gastrointestinal tract.

Presence

  1. A normal d-xylose test in the presence of steatorrhea indicates pancreatic exocrine insufficiency rather than small-intestine mucosal disease.

Study

  1. The primary objective of this study was to compare the effect of Creon 10 with placebo in the control of steatorrhea in chronic pancreatitis patients.

Treating

  1. Replacement pancreatic enzymes have proven somewhat effective in treating the malabsorption and steatorrhea. (Web site)

Hallmark

  1. Although physiologic steatorrhea can occur rarely in some conditions, steatorrhea is considered to be the hallmark of malabsorption.

Advanced Stage

  1. In its advanced stage, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis is characterized by pain, steatorrhea and diabetes. (Web site)

Treatment

  1. Treatment with pancreatic enzyme replacement, multivitamin supplementation, and regular to high fat diet improved her weight gain and steatorrhea.
  2. New enteric-coated high-lipase pancreatic extract in the treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea. (Web site)
  3. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation is used both for the treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea and for pain.

People

  1. People who cannot absorb fat often pass greasy stools or have chronic diarrhea, called steatorrhea. (Web site)

Loose

  1. This condition, called steatorrhea, causes loose, pale, unusually foul-smelling stools that may float in the toilet bowl. (Web site)
  2. This causes loose, oily, especially foul-smelling stools (called steatorrhea). (Web site)

Stool

  1. Steatorrhea— An excessive amount of fat in the stool.
  2. Steatorrhea occurs when 6% of dietary fat is excreted in the stool.

Cystic Fibrosis

  1. An enteric-coated high-buffered pancrelipase reduces steatorrhea in patients with cystic fibrosis: a prospective, randomized study.
  2. Therapeutic potential and clinical efficacy of acid-resistant fungal lipase in the treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea due to cystic fibrosis.

Fat Absorption

  1. People with medical problems such as Crohn's disease, cystic fibrosis, steatorrhea, and liver diseases (such as cirrhosis), which impair fat absorption. (Web site)

Common

  1. Steatorrhea, weight loss, maldigestion, and diabetes mellitus are common. (Web site)

Metabolic Bone Disease

  1. PSC is a progressive cholestatic disorder presenting with pruritus, steatorrhea, fat soluble vitamin deficiencies, and metabolic bone disease.
  2. Other associated disorders include bacterial cholangitis, pigmented bile stones, steatorrhea, malabsorption, metabolic bone disease. (Web site)

Normal Digestion

  1. By replacing missing enzymes, these tablets help restore normal digestion and alleviate steatorrhea, leading to weight gain and enhanced well-being. (Web site)

High Fat Content

  1. High fat content in the diarrhea (steatorrhea) suggests malabsorption or chronic pancreatic disease.

Fatty Stools

  1. Fatty stools, not occuring otherwise, are pathognomonic for pancreatogenic steatorrhea.

Result

  1. Subpotent doses of pancreatic enzyme products may result in patients experiencing steatorrhea, malnutrition, and consequent nutritional deficiencies. (Web site)

Abdominal Bloating

  1. The effects of unabsorbed substances include diarrhea, steatorrhea, abdominal bloating, and gas.

Weight

  1. Signs and symptoms include colicky abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, tenesmus, steatorrhea, weight loss, and nausea and vomiting.
  2. Malabsorption syndrome a pattern of symptoms including loss of appetite and bloating and weight loss and muscle pain and steatorrhea; associated with.
  3. Weight loss can be profound; it can be associated with anorexia, early satiety, diarrhea, or steatorrhea. (Web site)

Feces

  1. In medicine, the fecal fat test is a diagnostic test for fat malabsorption conditions, which lead to excess fat in the feces (steatorrhea). (Web site)
  2. Steatorrhea is the presence of excess fat in feces. (Web site)
  3. They may have an unpleasant condition called steatorrhea, in which the feces contain excessive fat, causing them to float and to be very foul smelling.

Disease

  1. Chronic use of laxatives may result in fluid and electrolyte imbalances, steatorrhea, osteomalacia, diarrhea, cathartic colon, and liver disease. (Web site)
  2. Patients' age, sex, alcohol consumption and smoking habits, duration of the disease, body mass index, and the presence of steatorrhea were recorded. (Web site)

Bulky

  1. Steatorrhea causes foul-smelling, pale, bulky, and greasy stools.
  2. The hallmark of steatorrhea is the passage of pale, bulky, and malodorous stools.

Patients

  1. All of these conditions should be considered in the evaluation of patients with steatorrhea in the setting of PSC (69) before treatment is recommended.
  2. The effect of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in patients with steatorrhea after total gastrectomy. (Web site)
  3. Patients are normally advised to maintain a diet low in fat (less than 40 gm per day) when steatorrhea is present. (Web site)

Chronic Pancreatitis

  1. Patients with chronic pancreatitis can present with persistent abdominal pain or steatorrhea, as well as severe nausea.
  2. Pancreatic steatorrhea, malabsorption, and nutrition biochemistry: a comparison of Japanese, European, and American patients with chronic pancreatitis.

Diarrhea

  1. Adults with celiac disease may have symptoms of diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss and flatulence; however, many adults do not have diarrhea or steatorrhea. (Web site)
  2. Patients with celiac disease may develop diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, flatulence, iron deficiency anemia, abnormal bleeding, or weakened bones. (Web site)
  3. Such symptoms include pale, bulky foul-smelling stools (steatorrhea), diarrhea, vomiting, and swelling (distension) of the abdomen. (Web site)

Stools

  1. Flatulence, steatorrhea (Excess fats in stools), belching, pruritus, ecchymosis, dark urine, and discolored stools are signs of Cholecystitis.
  2. Excessive fat in the stools is called "steatorrhea." Because food is not absorbed properly patients usually lose weight. (Web site)

Greasy

  1. These include diarrhea and steatorrhea - greasy, bad-smelling stools that result from poor fat digestion.
  2. Excessive excretion of fecal fat is called steatorrhea, a condition that is suspected when the patient has large, greasy, and foul-smelling stools. (Web site)

Fats

  1. Lack of bile also interferes with digestion (particularly of fats) and can also result in steatorrhea. (Web site)
  2. Digestion of fats is impaired, leading to loose, smelly stools ("steatorrhea").
  3. Stool: Increased fat content (steatorrhea) indicative of insufficient digestion of fats and protein. (Web site)

Fat

  1. High levels of fat in the feces causes steatorrhea, a type of feces that appears pale in color and greasy. (Web site)
  2. Steatorrhea, which is due to the malabsorption of fat, is suggested by foul-smelling, bulky stools that are difficult to flush.
  3. The inability to absorb fat in the ileum will result in steatorrhea, or fat in the stool. (Web site)

Pancreatic Insufficiency

  1. Study on pancreatic insufficiency (chronic pancreatitis) and steatorrhea in Japanese patients with low fat intake.
  2. Bone mineral density in patients with pancreatic insufficiency and steatorrhea. (Web site)
  3. In pancreatic insufficiency there is impaired lipolysis secondary to a deficiency in lipase, which can result in severe steatorrhea and diarrhea.

Fat-Soluble Vitamins

  1. Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may get depleted in those with fat malabsorption (steatorrhea, or any generalized malabsorption). (Web site)

Malabsorption

  1. Hoffman AF, Poley JR. Role of bile acid malabsorption in the pathogenesis of diarrhea and steatorrhea in patients with ileal resection. (Web site)
  2. This disease was characterized by malabsorption of fat and protein, steatorrhea, growth failure, and pulmonary infection. (Web site)
  3. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation is indicated for steatorrhea and malabsorption and may help relieve pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis. (Web site)

Fat Malabsorption

  1. Bile acid deficiency causes fat malabsorption and fatty stools (steatorrhea), indicated by diarrhea and floating stools.
  2. Fat malabsorption can cause a change in your stools called steatorrhea. (Web site)
  3. Steatorrhea is the result of fat malabsorption.

Steatorrhea

  1. Stools become bulky, greasy, foul smelling and tend to float in the water because of their high fat content - a condition known as steatorrhea. (Web site)
  2. Patients develop diarrhea because the fat is not absorbed (steatorrhea), and develop deficiencies of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K).
  3. Malabsorption, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins, and steatorrhea are uncommon except in the late stages of the disease[ 108].

Categories

  1. Fat Malabsorption
  2. Fat-Soluble Vitamins
  3. Greasy
  4. Stools
  5. Pancreatic Insufficiency
  6. Books about "Steatorrhea" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Steatorrhea"
  Originally created: May 28, 2008.
  Links checked: January 11, 2013.
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