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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Natural Resources > Minerals > Barium > Strontium   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS
INOCULANT
CATHODE RAY TUBES
STRONTIUM 89
TELEVISION PICTURE TUBES
STRONTIUM METAL
AIR
CHINA
SIMILAR
VITAMIN
TEETH
SENSITIVITY
RISK
RAPIDLY
CONCENTRATION
RED
FLAME
SODIUM
PERIODIC
OXIDE
IRON OXIDE
ELEMENT
RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE
NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS
PYROTECHNICS
CHEMICAL FORMULAS
STRONTIANITE
STRONTIUM CARBONATE
BONES
BONE
BONE MINERAL DENSITY
OSTEOPOROSIS
COMPOUNDS
FLUORINE
CARBONIC
SALTS
TANTALUM
ISOTOPES
RADIUM
STRONTIUM SULFATE
BARITE
WATER
MINERAL
NITRATES
NITRATE
MAGNESIUM
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Strontium"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Strontium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Sr and the atomic number 38.
  2. Strontium is a soft, silver-yellow metal with three allotropic crystalline forms (see allotropy).
  3. Strontium is softer than calcium and decomposes in water more vigorously.
  4. Strontium is found chiefly as celestite and strontianite. (Web site)
  5. Strontium is named for the town of Strontian in Scotland.

Rare Earth Elements

  1. This is usually in the form of mobile, soluble elements such as barium, strontium, rubidium, calcium and some rare earth elements. (Web site)

Inoculant

  1. The exact chemical form or structure of the strontium in the inoculant is not precisely known. (Web site)

Cathode Ray Tubes

  1. The principal end-use for strontium is in cathode ray tubes for colour monitors and televisions. (Web site)

Strontium 89

  1. Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive materials such as iodine 131 and strontium 89. (Web site)

Television Picture Tubes

  1. The major use for strontium at present is in producing glass for color television picture tubes.
  2. Strontium carbonate is used on a large scale in making television picture tubes. (Web site)

Strontium Metal

  1. Generally, a molten bath of ferrosilicon is formed to which a strontium metal or strontium silicide is added along with a rare earth. (Web site)

Air

  1. Finely powdered strontium metal will ignite spontaneously in air. (Web site)
  2. Finely powered strontium metal will ignite spontaneously in air.

China

  1. Chongqing also contains China's largest reserve of strontium, and China has the 2nd largest reserve of the mineral in the world.
  2. In 2005, China was the top producer of strontium with almost two-thirds world share followed by Spain and Mexico, reports the British Geological Survey. (Web site)
  3. China is becoming an increasingly important producer of strontium carbonate with a production capacity now estimated at around 35,000tpy. (Web site)

Similar

  1. Although strontium has uses similar to those of calcium and barium, it is rarely employed because of its higher cost.
  2. The production of strontium compounds from this mineral is similar to the above-described production of barium compounds. (Web site)

Vitamin

  1. Vitamin K and a new supplement called strontium ranelate have also shown promise. (Web site)

Teeth

  1. The polymer apparently adheres to teeth and releases the strontium over time. (Web site)
  2. Typically, desensitizing agents such as strontium chloride are used in dentifrices for "sensitive" teeth. (Web site)

Sensitivity

  1. Macleans Sensitive contains Strontium Acetate, an active ingredient to reduce sensitivity and to protect the exposed and sensitive areas of the teeth. (Web site)

Risk

  1. Levels of strontium in the water supply have been shown to correlate with the risk of dental caries in communities with similar fluoride levels.

Rapidly

  1. Strontium (Sr): a silvery, soft metal that rapidly turns yellow in air. (Web site)

Concentration

  1. Strontium sulfate is a critical reverse osmosis membrane foulant, dependent on its concentration. (Web site)

Red

  1. Barium chloride produces green; strontium chloride produces red; copper chloride produces blue. (Web site)
  2. Copper and strontium compounds in suitable proportions produce a mixture of red and blue light, giving various shades of purple. (Web site)

Flame

  1. Strontium and its salts emit a brilliant red color in flame. (Web site)
  2. The flame test works because the elements barium (Ba) and strontium (Sr) react in the flame and produce those colors. (Web site)

Sodium

  1. And trace amounts of copper, strontium, titanium, manganese, sodium, vanadium, boron and zirconium.

Periodic

  1. Chemically it resembles strontium and barium; it is classed with them as an alkaline-earth metal in Group 2 of the periodic table.

Oxide

  1. Freshly cut strontium has a silvery appearance, but rapidly turns a yellowish color with the formation of the oxide.

Iron Oxide

  1. These are prepared using iron oxide and strontium or barium oxide, compressed together with some ceramic binder. (Web site)

Element

  1. In the hills to the north of Strontian was discovered the mineral strontianite, from which the element strontium was first isolated.
  2. It was mined for a while in Germany for strontium, an element used as a coloring agent of fireworks and other applications. (Web site)

Radioactive Isotope

  1. A radioactive isotope of strontium, strontium-90, is a component of nuclear fallout. (Web site)

Nuclear Explosions

  1. Strontium 90, a radioactive isotope of strontium, can be in the fallout from nuclear explosions. (Web site)
  2. Y-90 exists in equilibrium with its parent isotope strontium -90, which is a product of nuclear explosions.

Pyrotechnics

  1. Volatile strontium salts impart a crimson color to flames, and these salts are used in pyrotechnics and in the production of flares. (Web site)

Chemical Formulas

  1. It is not isomorphous with the orthorhombic barium (baryte) and strontium (celestine) sulfates, as might be expected from the chemical formulas. (Web site)

Strontianite

  1. Strontianite is now known to consist of strontium carbonate. (Web site)
  2. Strontianite is a rare carbonate mineral and one of only a few strontium minerals. (Web site)

Strontium Carbonate

  1. The use of strontium carbonate in CRTs for televisions and computer monitors remains the main market for strontium, accounting for around 70% of demand. (Web site)
  2. The main application for strontium is the use of strontium carbonate in cathode ray tubes for colour televisions and colour computer monitors. (Web site)
  3. Strontium carbonate (Sr CO 3) is the carbonate salt of strontium that has the appearance of a white or grey powder.

Bones

  1. Strontium 89: A radioactive substance that is used for treatment of bone pain caused by metastatic cancer in bones, such as prostate, breast, etc.

Bone

  1. Strontium. Strontium, a chemical element found in bone, may help increase bone formation and decrease bone resorption.
  2. Since Strontium is so similar to calcium, it is incorporated in the bone.
  3. The strontium acts like calcium and is preferentially incorporated into bone at sites of increased osteogenesis. (Web site)

Bone Mineral Density

  1. Influence of strontium on bone mineral density and bone mineral content measurements by dual X-ray absorptiormetry.

Osteoporosis

  1. Strontium ranelate has been shown to strengthen bones, according presentations given the IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis, in June of 2006.
  2. Strontium ranelate reduces the risk of nonvertabral fractures in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis: tropos study. (Web site)
  3. The best and largest study on strontium was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 1,649 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. (Web site)

Compounds

  1. Principal uses of strontium compounds are in pyrotechnics (chiefly the nitrate) and in greases (the hydroxide).
  2. The strontium compounds disclosed were the strontium chloride, acetate, bromise, lactate, iodide, nitrate and salicylate. (Web site)
  3. Strontium carbonate is also used to make certain kinds of glass and is the base material for making most other strontium compounds. (Web site)

Fluorine

  1. Carbonatite deposits are exploited primarily for lead, zinc, niobium, rare earth elements (REE), uranium, thorium, barium, strontium, and fluorine.

Carbonic

  1. Change to carbonic acid strontium after heated. (Web site)

Salts

  1. Unlike other strontium salts, the carbonate salt is generally preferred because of its cost and the fact that it is not hygroscopic. (Web site)
  2. It is used in the preparation of iridescent glass, luminous paints, strontium oxide or strontium salts and in refining sugar.
  3. Desensitizing agents include potassium salts, and strontium salts especially potassium nitrate, strontium chloride and the like. (Web site)

Tantalum

  1. To these belong the standards identifying ytterbium, barium, strontium, tantalum, iridiu m.

Isotopes

  1. For fission of uranium-235, the predominant radioactive fission products include isotopes of iodine, caesium, strontium, xenon and barium. (Web site)
  2. Isotopes of strontium are used in radioisotope scanning procedures of bone. (Web site)

Radium

  1. As a member of the family of alkaline earth metals, barium lies in group two (former group 2A) of the periodic table, between strontium and radium.

Strontium Sulfate

  1. Celestine, Celestite, Blue Quartz is a mineral consisting of strontium sulfate. (Web site)
  2. Reverse Osmosis will also reduce strontium but as stated above strontium sulfate is a membrane foulant.
  3. Chemical Composition: Celestite is strontium sulfate, sometimes with much Barium. (Web site)

Barite

  1. Common sulfates include anhydrite (calcium sulfate), celestite (strontium sulfate), barite (barium sulfate), and gypsum (hydrated calcium sulfate). (Web site)
  2. Common sulfates include anhydrite (calcium sulfate), celestine (strontium sulfate), barite (barium sulfate), and gypsum (hydrated calcium sulfate).

Water

  1. Since strontium reacts vigorously with water and quickly tarnishes in air, it must be stored out of contact with air and water.
  2. The presence of strontium is usually restricted to areas where there are lead ores, and its concentration in water is usually very low. (Web site)
  3. Strontium carbonate is insoluble in water, but reacts with acids and will dissolve in carbonic acid and ammonium salts. (Web site)

Mineral

  1. Acuminite (or Acuminit or Acuminita) Sr[AlF4(OH)(H2O)] is a mineral of strontium, aluminium, fluorine, oxygen, and hydrogen.
  2. Both strontium and strontianite are named after Strontian, a village in Scotland near which the mineral was first discovered. (Web site)
  3. Coelestine is a mineral used in pyrotechnics and a s a source of strontium.

Nitrates

  1. E.S.V. Strontium Chloride Solution is a very pure and concentrated form of strontium, free of phosphates and nitrates. (Web site)

Nitrate

  1. Preferred strontium compounds are strontium acetate, strontium chloride, strontium nitrate. (Web site)
  2. Used to prepare nitrate of strontium for fireworks and tracer bullets and in the refining of beet sugar.
  3. Now, fireworks makers rely on compounds such as barium nitrate, strontium carbonate or nitrate, sodium oxalate, and copper carbonate. (Web site)

Magnesium

  1. It belongs to the alkaline earth family of metals, including beryllium, magnesium, strontium and barium. (Web site)
  2. Used as directed, Reef Carbonate will not deplete calcium, magnesium, or strontium which usually tend to precipitate with increasing alkalinity.
  3. Sea water and algae contain magnesium, strontium and algal polysaccharides fucoidan laminara which have antibacterial and antiviral properties.

Categories

  1. Nature > Natural Resources > Minerals > Barium
  2. Society > Culture > Entertainment > Fireworks
  3. Humans > Medicine > Drugs > Calcium
  4. Nature > Matter > Materials > Magnesium
  5. Matter > Atoms > Nitrogen > Nitrate

Subcategories

Strontianite

    Related Keywords

      * Barium * Calcium * Fireworks
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      Short phrases about "Strontium"
      Originally created: May 07, 2008.
      Links checked: February 18, 2013.
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