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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Time > Events > Earthquakes > Subduction Zones   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
COLLISION ZONES
DIVERGENT ZONES
EARTHQUAKE FAULT ZONES
ACTIVE EARTHQUAKE ZONES
EURAMERICA
SUBDUCTION ZONES START
OCEAN PLATE
SLOWER PLATE MOTIONS
ISLAND ARCS FORM
ANDESITIC VOLCANOES
DEEP-OCEAN TRENCHES
DEEP-SEA TRENCHES
ACTIVE SUBDUCTION ZONES
OCEAN BASINS
MID-OCEANIC RIDGES
TECTONIC SUBDUCTION ZONES
SUBDUCTION ZONES MARK SITES
VOLCANIC ARCS
PLATE BOUNDARIES
RELATION
BEHAVIOR
SITES
INTRODUCTION
FIGURE
NOTORIOUS
NORTH
EVENTS
EDGES
LONG CHAINS
CHAINS
WORLD
PLACES
ANTARCTICA
PLANET
COMMON
ASSOCIATED
AREAS
DEPTHS
DEPTH
THRUST
ROCKS
CHILE
ANDES
TREMORS
CONTINENTS
PACIFIC PLATE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Subduction Zones"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Subduction zones are places where two plates collide, and the edge of one plate pushes beneath the edge of the other in a process called subduction.
  2. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. (Web site)
  3. Subduction zones are the sites of oceanic trenches, high earthquake activity, and most of the world's major volcanoes.
  4. Subduction zones are one type of convergent plate boundary where either an oceanic or a continental plate overrides an oceanic plate. (Web site)
  5. Subduction zones are marked by deep trenches and overlying chains of volcanoes (the Andes, for example). (Web site)

Collision Zones

  1. Basins associated with collision zones and subduction zones are where most of the remaining giant oil fields are found. (Web site)

Divergent Zones

  1. As crust is destroyed in subduction zones, it is being created in divergent zones. (Web site)

Earthquake Fault Zones

  1. Zhao, D., New advances of seismic tomography and its applications to subduction zones and earthquake fault zones, Isl. (Web site)

Active Earthquake Zones

  1. Subduction zones are usually active earthquake zones. (Web site)

Euramerica

  1. The supercontinent Gondwana and the newly joined Euramerica were surrounded by subduction zones on all sides. (Web site)

Subduction Zones Start

  1. This would effectively stop plate tectonics unless new subduction zones start up, but subduction initiation is poorly understood.

Ocean Plate

  1. Thick, cold, dense oceanic lithosphere sinks at subduction zones, pulling the rest of the ocean plate. (Web site)

Slower Plate Motions

  1. Some other subduction zones have such earthquakes every 100 to 200 years; the longer interval results from slower plate motions. (Web site)

Island Arcs Form

  1. Long curved chains of islands known as island arcs form at such subduction zones.

Andesitic Volcanoes

  1. These “ andesitic ” volcanoes generally only occur above subduction zones (e.g.

Deep-Ocean Trenches

  1. Subduction zones are characterized by deep-ocean trenches, shallow to deep earthquakes, and mountain ranges containing active volcanoes. (Web site)

Deep-Sea Trenches

  1. Transform faults also connect spreading centres to subduction zones (deep-sea trenches). (Web site)

Active Subduction Zones

  1. They develop beneath volcanic island arcs and continental margins above active subduction zones. (Web site)

Ocean Basins

  1. Bonatti, E. & Michael, P. J. (1989). Mantle peridotites from continental rifts to ocean basins to subduction zones.

Mid-Oceanic Ridges

  1. Figure 2–6 Sea floor topography is dominated by huge undersea mountain chains called mid-oceanic ridges and deep trenches called subduction zones. (Web site)

Tectonic Subduction Zones

  1. Most of the Earth's volcanoes are located at or near tectonic subduction zones and the mid-ocean ridges. (Web site)

Subduction Zones Mark Sites

  1. Subduction zones mark sites of convective downwelling of the Earth's lithosphere (the crust plus the strong portion of the upper mantle). (Web site)

Volcanic Arcs

  1. Calc-alkaline rocks typically are found above subduction zones, commonly in volcanic arcs, and particularly on those arcs on continental crust.

Plate Boundaries

  1. These plates converge at deep-sea trenches, plate boundaries where one plate sinks (subducts) below the other at so-called subduction zones. (Web site)
  2. Volcanoes Other than hotspot volcanoes, these cluster along plate boundaries as well, commonly near the deep-ocean trenches that define subduction zones. (Web site)

Relation

  1. It is not yet clear whether there is any relation between the giant earthquakes of subduction zones and silent earthquakes. (Web site)

Behavior

  1. In addition, understanding the circulation of water through the oceanic crust may shed light on the behavior of subduction zones. (Web site)

Sites

  1. Subduction zones are the only sites of deep earthquakes. (Web site)

Introduction

  1. Introduction to Volcanic Arc systems highlights the importance of understanding how subduction zones operate.

Figure

  1. Figure 2. Distribution of strong earthquakes for two subduction zones. (Web site)

Notorious

  1. Subduction zones are also notorious for producing devastating earthquakes because of the intense geological activity. (Web site)

North

  1. A major transform fault is located just north of the Galapagos at 91 W. Subduction zones occur where plates collide. (Web site)

Events

  1. Such events are especially concentrated around the Pacific Ocean where the majority of subduction zones are located. (Web site)

Edges

  1. Hardly like the drawings they show in books is it?) Subduction zones and trenches generally line the edges of newly created volcanic islands.

Long Chains

  1. Above subduction zones, volcanoes exist in long chains called volcanic arcs. (Web site)
  2. Above subduction zones, volcanoes exist in long chains called volcanic arc s.

Chains

  1. All subduction zones have, at some distance in from the edge of the upper plate, arcs or chains of composite cone volcanoes.

World

  1. With reference now to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates the locations of subduction zones and plates throughout the world. (Web site)
  2. This would make the Cascadia subduction zone unlike most other subduction zones around the world.

Places

  1. They're only found in a few places around the world, in places that used to be subduction zones (or still are, in some cases). (Web site)

Antarctica

  1. Today, dozens of these environments are known in subduction zones near Costa Rica; Monterey Bay, Calif.; Japan; Alaska and Antarctica.

Planet

  1. Anomalously deep events are a characteristic of subduction zones which produce the deepest earthquakes on the planet. (Web site)
  2. Anomalously deep events are a characteristic of subduction zones which produce the deepest earthquake s on the planet.
  3. On the planet, new crust is formed at diverging plate margins and destroyed at subduction zones.

Common

  1. Although common for most other subduction zones, no such events have occurred on this coast in the 200 year historical period. (Web site)
  2. However, in common with most other subduction zones, the outer margin is slowly being compressed, similar to a giant spring. (Web site)

Associated

  1. These narrow plate-boundary sites, known as subduction zones, are also associated with the formation of deep ocean trenches and big earthquakes.
  2. Subduction zones are associated with the deepest earthquake s on the planet. (Web site)
  3. Associated with subduction zones is earthquakes and fault lines.

Areas

  1. Many earthquakes occur at subduction zones, and volcanic ridges and oceanic trenches form in these areas. (Web site)
  2. Subduction zones are areas of high earthquake activity. (Web site)
  3. Mageik (above) occur along subduction zones, areas where one tectonic plate is sinking beneath another one.

Depths

  1. However, in subduction zones, earthquakes occur at depths as great as 700 km. (Web site)

Depth

  1. At subduction zones where plates descend into the mantle earthquakes have been recorded to a depth of 600 km.

Thrust

  1. Most trenches occur at subduction zones, where one tectonic plate is thrust under another. (Web site)

Rocks

  1. Magmas of such rocks are formed in a variety of environments, including continental rifts, ocean islands, and supra-subduction positions in subduction zones. (Web site)
  2. These rocks are found near the subduction zones of ocean tectonic plates, along continental margins. (Web site)

Chile

  1. Compressional boundaries host Earth's largest quakes, with some events on subduction zones in Alaska and Chile having exceeded magnitude 9. (Web site)
  2. Subduction zones can create very strong earthquakes, as evidenced in Chile.

Andes

  1. Another good site showing deep earthquakes at subduction zones; in this case, the Andes.

Tremors

  1. Similar deep tremors are being tracked at other subduction zones around the globe, including in Alaska, Japan, Mexico and Chile.
  2. Tremors have been detected in other subduction zones (Japan, Cascadia) and their origin remains poorly understood. (Web site)

Continents

  1. Many subduction zones are near or at the coastline of continents or islands.

Pacific Plate

  1. These regions are known as subduction zones and can be seen around much of the Pacific plate. (Web site)
  2. Two subduction zones are located within 200 miles of United States territory as illustrated in FIG. 1. These are the Gorda Plate and the Pacific Plate. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Time > Events > Earthquakes
  2. Plates
  3. Trenches
  4. Events > Earthquakes > Plate Tectonics > Oceanic Crust
  5. Mantle

Related Keywords

    * Alpine Fault * Andesites * Andesitic * Archaean * Asthenosphere * Back * Continental Crust * Continental Lithosphere * Continental Margins * Convergent Plate Boundaries * Crust * Crustal Plates * Earth * Earthquake * Earthquakes * Faults * Form * Geophys * Hot Spots * Island Arcs * Large Earthquakes * Lithosphere * Mantle * Mantle Plumes * Mid-Ocean Ridges * Midocean Ridges * Ocean * Oceanic * Oceanic Crust * Oceanic Lithosphere * Oceanic Plate * Oceanic Plates * Oceans * Ocean Crust * Ocean Floor * Ocean Trenches * Orogenic Belts * Pacific * Pacific Ocean * Pacific Rim * Plate * Plates * Plate Motions * Quakes * Recycled * Recycled Back * Result * Ridges * Rift Zones * Seafloor Spreading * Sediments * Slab * Slabs * South America * Spreading Centers * Spreading Ridges * Stratovolcanoes * Subducted * Subducted Plate * Subducting Plate * Subduction * Tectonic Plates * Transform Faults * Trenches * Volcanoes * Water * Zones
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  Short phrases about "Subduction Zones"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: June 11, 2013.
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