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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nutrition > Nutrients > Carbohydrates > Fructose > Sucrose   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
SUCROSE INGESTION
SUCROSE DENSITY GRADIENT
SUCROSE MOLECULES
DIETARY SUCROSE
COMMON SUGAR
FRUCTOSE MOLECULE
ORGANIC ACIDS
MAIN SUGAR
INTRAVENOUS IRON SUCROSE
SUCROSE MIST 14C
IRON SUCROSE
ENERGY
MEASUREMENT
DIARRHEA
STARCHY FOODS
PLANTS
MEANS
ROOT
COMMON
COMPOUNDS
LIQUID
PRODUCT
COMBINATION
CANE SUGAR
REACTING
REFINED
GRAM-NEGATIVE
STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS
STREP
FORM
CARBON DIOXIDE
FERMENTATION
TOOTH SURFACE
ETC
EXAMPLES
JUICE
MILK SUGAR
ENZYME
CALORIES
TEETH
PRODUCTS
HONEY
SWEETENED
FOODS
ASPARTAME
SWEETNESS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Sucrose"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Sucrose (table sugar) is the source of most dietary sugar, found in sugar cane, honey, and corn syrup. (Web site)
  2. Sucrose is the disaccharide formed from the enzymatic dehydration reaction between glucose and fructose. (Web site)
  3. Sucrose, a disaccharide, is derived from sugar cane or beet root but is often refined to remove the cane juice, which contains trace nutrients.
  4. Sucrose is the only sugar that S. mutans can use to form this sticky polysaccharide.
  5. Sucrose is the form of sugar we are most familiar with. (Web site)

Sucrose Ingestion

  1. Sucraid has been found to relieve many of the symptoms associated with sucrose ingestion by individuals with this disorder.

Sucrose Density Gradient

  1. Membrane fractions G1 and G2 of H. pylori P132 prepared from a sucrose density gradient were estimated to have an outer membrane content of ca. (Web site)

Sucrose Molecules

  1. Grapes accumulate sugars as they grow on the grapevine through the translocation of sucrose molecules that are produced by photosynthesis from the leaves.

Dietary Sucrose

  1. These data suggest the possibility that S mutans can establish itself in the human mouth in the absence of dietary sucrose. (Web site)

Common Sugar

  1. Fructose is used as a substitute for sucrose (common sugar) because it is less expensive and has little effect on measured blood glucose levels. (Web site)

Fructose Molecule

  1. Its more common usage refers to dimers as certain types of sugar: sucrose, for example, is a dimer of a glucose molecule and a fructose molecule.

Organic Acids

  1. Sucrose also releases glucose during digestion, and oral bacteria can metabolize the glucose to produce organic acids.

Main Sugar

  1. The main sugar in pure Maple syrup is sucrose.

Intravenous Iron Sucrose

  1. Hausken T. Oral ferrous fumarate or intravenous iron sucrose for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. (Web site)

Sucrose Mist 14C

  1. As the sucrose melt 14b is pumped through injector 34 into the combustion chamber 40, the sucrose melt 14b is atomized to produce a sucrose mist 14c. (Web site)

Iron Sucrose

  1. FIG. 2: Effects of treatment with EPO and iron sucrose according to Example 1. (Web site)

Energy

  1. Sucrose serves as a source of energy to make up for the loss of the functioning leaves and insures continued development and longevity of the flower. (Web site)
  2. Heat energy produced by combustion of the sucrose mist 114c can be augmented by combustion of a flammable gas (not shown) such as methane or hydrogen. (Web site)
  3. The body must convert table sugar (sucrose) into glucose to burn it for energy.

Measurement

  1. Brix A measurement of the dissolved sucrose level in a wine.

Diarrhea

  1. A similar benefit was identified in infants with a sucrase deficiency, which causes diarrhea from sucrose ingestion. (Web site)

Starchy Foods

  1. Many starchy foods have a glycemic index similar to table sugar (sucrose).

Plants

  1. Sucrose, pictured to the right, is the most abundant disaccharide, and the main form in which carbohydrates are transported in plants. (Web site)
  2. Sucrose A natural, crystalline disaccharide found in grapes, most fruit and many plants.

Means

  1. Sucrose and lactose serve as fermentable carbohydrate sources which encourage the growth of fecal coliforms and provide a means of differentiating them. (Web site)

Root

  1. When grown in sucrose alone, S. mutans produced significantly deeper lesions in both root and enamel surfaces when compared with A. viscosus. (Web site)

Common

  1. Plants protect themselves from frost and dehydration stress with antifreeze proteins, heat-shock proteins and sugars (sucrose is common). (Web site)
  2. By comparison, common table sugar (sucrose) is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose.
  3. When sucrose, the most common of sugars, coats the surface of the mouth, some intraoral bacteria interact with it and form lactic acid.

Compounds

  1. As a result, lactose, sucrose and other compounds made from carbohydrates cannot be digested by individuals with glucose-galactose malabsorption. (Web site)

Liquid

  1. However, when the proteins are moving through a sucrose gradient, they encounter liquid of increasing density and viscosity. (Web site)

Product

  1. If the sucrose (or other sugar) replaced has contributed to the texture of the product, then a bulking agent is often also needed. (Web site)

Combination

  1. In other species, sucrose reaches sieve-tube members by a combination of symplastic and apoplastic pathways. (Web site)

Cane Sugar

  1. But as a country, regular cane sugar, or sucrose (50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose), is no longer the sugar of choice. (Web site)

Reacting

  1. A number of methods are available for reacting all or most of the hydroxyl groups in sucrose with fatty acids.

Refined

  1. Refineries, often located nearer to consumers in North America, Europe, and Japan, then produce refined white sugar, which is 99 percent sucrose. (Web site)

Gram-Negative

  1. Organism 2 is Gram-negative and can ferment sucrose.

Streptococcus Mutans

  1. If the rats were infected with Streptococcus mutans, however, they developed the highest decay levels if they drank sucrose, researchers said. (Web site)

Strep

  1. The combination of starch and sucrose resulted in rapid formation of elevated amounts of EPS matrix and faster assembly of microcolonies by Strep.

Form

  1. Free fructose does not undergo digestion; however when fructose is consumed in the form of sucrose, digestion occurs entirely in the upper small intestine.

Carbon Dioxide

  1. Complete combustion of sucrose produces carbon dioxide, water, and 1342.2 kilocalories per mole. (Web site)
  2. This is caused by the addition of sucrose and special yeasts that convert the sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Fermentation

  1. Yeast is added to the sugar cane juice or molasses, which converts the sucrose to alcohol during fermentation. (Web site)
  2. He proposed the genus name Morganella for these strains, which were negative for the fermentation of lactose or sucrose but produced indole (35). (Web site)
  3. Process variations During fermentation, components of the sucrose molecules are converted into ethanol. (Web site)

Tooth Surface

  1. From sucrose, the organism synthesizes adhesive extracellular glucans that mediate the firm attachment of cells to the tooth surface. (Web site)

Etc

  1. Sucrose fatty esters include sucrose stearate, sucrose oleate, sucrose isostearate, sucrose cocoate, sucrose distearate, etc. (Web site)

Examples

  1. References in periodicals archive No references found For examples, lactase breaks down lactose, sucrase breaks down sucrose.

Juice

  1. Each ton of b&c yields 740 kg of juice (135 kg of sucrose and 605 kg of water) and 260 kg of moist bagasse (130 kg of dry bagasse). (Web site)
  2. The major carbohydrate components of juice are: sucrose, glucose, fructose, and sorbitol. (Web site)

Milk Sugar

  1. Lactase breaks down lactose or milk sugar in the same way sucrase enzymes breaks down sugar or sucrose.
  2. Two glucose units form maltose, a glucose and a fructose produce sucrose (table sugar), a glucose and galactose form lactose (milk sugar). (Web site)

Enzyme

  1. The term "enzyme" was used to describe the substance(s) in yeast extract that brought about the fermentation of sucrose. (Web site)
  2. The pDM4 vector contains sacB, which produces an enzyme that converts sucrose into a product that is toxic to gram-negative bacteria. (Web site)
  3. Antibodies against the enzyme or against the glucan binding site lead to an inhibition of the sucrose dependent adhesion of S. mutans. (Web site)

Calories

  1. Agave syrup is not low calorie -- it has about 16 calories per teaspoon, the same as sucrose (table sugar). (Web site)

Teeth

  1. When you eat sweets, Streptococcus mutans transforms the sucrose into sticky polysaccharides which they use to stick to your teeth. (Web site)
  2. Thus, children were matched by gender, age, number of erupted teeth, total levels of salivary IgA, and sucrose intake at home. (Web site)
  3. S mutans strain 6715 also appeared to have some affinity for teeth in the absence of dietary sucrose that may be of ecological significance. (Web site)

Products

  1. It is positive for Urease production, is Oxidase negative, and can utilize Glucose, Sucrose, and Lactose to form acid products. (Web site)
  2. AM fungi take up the products of the plant host’s photosynthesis as hexoses, fructose and sucrose. (Web site)

Honey

  1. Agave has a glycemic index of 46; honey is 58 and glucose (like sucrose – table sugar type) is 100; the lower the number the better it is for you. (Web site)

Sweetened

  1. Homebrewed root beer is usually sweetened with table sugar (sucrose), and is usually carbonated by adding yeast.

Foods

  1. So ideal for children because foods made with xylitol taste just as good as those sweetened with sucrose. (Web site)

Aspartame

  1. A few examples of sugar-sugar substitutes are fructose, sucrose, lactose, and aspartame, and it is the number one cause of obesity. (Web site)
  2. Sugar-free Red Bull is sweetened with aspartame and acesulfame potassium, as opposed to sucrose and glucose.

Sweetness

  1. These are compounds with sweetness that is many times that of sucrose, common table sugar. (Web site)
  2. Of these, xylitol is perhaps the most popular due to its similarity to sucrose in appearance and sweetness.

Categories

  1. Nutrition > Nutrients > Carbohydrates > Fructose
  2. Home > Cooking > Foods > Sugar
  3. Home > Cooking > Foods > Glucose
  4. Sorbitol
  5. Lactose

Related Keywords

    * Acid-Producing * Beet * Beets * Buffered * Carbohydrate * Carbohydrates * Carbon Sources * Caries * Caries Incidence * Caries Risk * Cavities * Corn * Corn Syrup * Diabetes * Digestion * Disaccharide * Disaccharides * Effect * Enzymes * Fructans * Fructose * Fungi * Glucose * Glycerol * Hfcs * High-Fructose Corn Syrup * High Concentration * High Fructose Corn Syrup * Hydrolysis * Intolerance * Invert Sugar * Ketone Group * Lactic * Lactose * Magnesium Stearate * Maltose * Maple Syrup * Molecule * Mutans * Patients * Plaque * Polyols * Presence * Prevalent Form * Refined Sugar * Sap * Simple Sugar * Simple Sugars * Sorbitol * Starch * Starches * Stearic * Sucralose * Sugar * Sugars * Sugar Alcohols * Sugar Beet * Sugar Beets * Surimi * Sweet * Sweetener * Sweeter * Syrup * Tooth Decay * Trehalose * Water * Xylitol
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  Short phrases about "Sucrose"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: July 20, 2013.
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