KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Thames       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Settlements > Cities > Capitals > London > Thames   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
SUNBURY
SOUTHWEST LONDON
TWICKENHAM
COOKHAM
JUBILEE RIVER
DARTFORD
MEDWAY
PUTNEY BRIDGE
PUTNEY
PUNTING
CHERWELL
COTSWOLDS
CHILTERNS
WEST
CONFLUENCE
LONDON BOROUGH
SOUTH WEST LONDON
CANARY WHARF
GREENWICH
CROYDON
RIVER WANDLE
BARGES
NAVIGABLE
SOUTHERN ENGLAND
ESTUARY
SEVERN
ROWING
HENLEY
WHARVES
SHAD THAMES
KENT
GRAVESEND
SOUTHERN BANK
THAMES RIVER
LEGOLAND
CENTRAL LONDON
STAINES
NORTH BANK
THAMES VALLEY
WINDSOR
ROUTE
THAMES PATH
TEDDINGTON
TEDDINGTON LOCK
WOOLWICH
THAMES BARRIER
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Thames"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Thames is a coastal settlement, close to the mouths of the Kauaeranga and Waihou Rivers.
  2. THAMES, the chief river of England, rising in several small streams among the Cotteswold Hills in Gloucestershire. (Web site)
  3. The Thames was known by the Romans as "Tamesis" below Dorchester while the part running on to the source seems to have been called "Isis". (Web site)
  4. The Thames is navigable from the estuary as far as Lechlade in Gloucestershire and for small unpowered craft to Cricklade. (Web site)
  5. The Thames (pronounced [ temz]) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea.

Sunbury

  1. As of 2008, summer regattas with punt races are held at Sunbury, Chertsey, Walton, Wraysbury, Thames Ditton, and Teddington. (Web site)

Southwest London

  1. Hammersmith Bridge, the first suspension bridge over the River Thames, carries traffic to and from Barnes and southwest London. (Web site)
  2. Her body was found in the Thames, near Richmond Bridge, southwest London, on Saturday 11th January 2009.

Twickenham

  1. The borough was formed in 1965 by the merger of the Middlesex borough of Twickenham with the Surrey boroughs of Richmond upon Thames and Barnes.
  2. Marble Hill House is a Palladian villa on the River Thames in Twickenham, southwest London situated halfway between Richmond and Twickenham.
  3. A short passage to Brentford and then a dash along the Tidal Thames to Teddington Lock passing Richmond and Twickenham.

Cookham

  1. Cookham Lock is a lock with weirs situated on the River Thames near Cookham, Berkshire. (Web site)
  2. Boulters Lock is a lock and weir situated on the River Thames on the eastern side of Maidenhead (formerly in Cookham) in the English county of Berkshire. (Web site)
  3. Cookham is a village and civil parish in the north-easternmost corner of Berkshire in England, on the River Thames.

Jubilee River

  1. The Jubilee River is a new channel which was built during the 1990s to divert flood waters from the River Thames around Maidenhead, Windsor and Eton. (Web site)
  2. Glen Island is a large area of land between the head of the Jubilee River and the River Thames at Boulter's Lock near Maidenhead.

Dartford

  1. The river below Dartford comes under the jurisdiction of the Kent and Essex forces while the river above Staines is policed by Thames Valley. (Web site)
  2. For smallpox the Board maintains hospital ships moored in the Thames at Dartford, and a land establishment at the same place. (Web site)

Medway

  1. As a ship 'in ordinary' she was used for various secondary roles such as a powder hulk at Woolwich on the Thames and on The Medway.
  2. The Dutch navy even entered the Thames in 1667 in the raid on the Medway.
  3. The massive expansion of 120,000 new homes in the Thames Gateway, of which Medway is a part, will need nurses, teachers and social workers to make it work. (Web site)

Putney Bridge

  1. Putney Bridge is a bridge crossing of the River Thames in west London, linking Putney on the south side with Fulham to the north. (Web site)
  2. Putney Bridge is often very busy on Saturdays, when Fulham F.C. are playing at home, as this is the main way for fans to cross the Old Father Thames.

Putney

  1. Fulham nestles in a loop of the Thames across the river from Barnes and Putney.
  2. Vertical navy blue and white bars are the racing colours of London Rowing Club, based on the Thames at Putney, the start of the annual boat race.
  3. Starting out in scenic Wandsworth Park, this 5.5km route along the Thames will take in Putney, Chelsea and finish just past Battersea Bridge.

Punting

  1. The River Thames offers extensive opportunities for water based sports including rowing, canoeing, kayaking, skiffing, punting and sailing. (Web site)

Cherwell

  1. Flood water from the Cherwell is combining with the Thames and flooding in Oxford is expected to be worse than that experienced in the Oxford area in 2003.
  2. Oxford grew up at the conjunction of two rivers, the Thames and the Cherwell (pronounced Char-well). (Web site)
  3. The town became established as twin settlements on opposite banks of the River Bure, a tributary of the Ray, Cherwell and ultimately the Thames. (Web site)

Cotswolds

  1. Its usually quoted source is at Thames Head (at), about a mile north of the village of Kemble and near the town of Cirencester, in the Cotswolds.
  2. Adopting not only its route but also some of its flavour the waterway glides gracefully through the Cotswolds to the Thames.
  3. Geographical features include the river Thames and it's tributaries, the Cotswolds and the Chiltern Hills. (Web site)

Chilterns

  1. Goring Gap, where the Thames broke through the Chilterns, seen from Lardon Chase. (Web site)
  2. Wallingford is on the western side of the River Thames and lies at the foot of the Chilterns.
  3. The house offers excellent, well proportioned rooms maximising the southerly views over the Chilterns and the Thames Valley.

West

  1. It extended from Wanstead Flats in the north to the River Thames in the south and from Green Street in the west to Barking Creek in the east.
  2. It lies on the River Thames and is situated 25.7 miles (41.4 km) west of Charing Cross in London. (Web site)
  3. Battersea runs south of the River Thames from Fairfield ward in the west to the ward of Queenstown in the east.

Confluence

  1. The town grew up as a river port at the confluence of the Thames and Kennet.
  2. The town is situated north of the A13 road and east of the River Roding near its confluence with the River Thames in metropolitan Essex.
  3. It runs for approximately 23 kilometres (14 mi) from its source near the village of Compton to its confluence with the Thames in the village of Pangbourne.

London Borough

  1. Richmond is a suburban town in southwest London, England and part of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.
  2. Richmond is a suburb in southwest London, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.
  3. Isleworth is a place in the London Borough of Hounslow alongside the River Thames in west London.

South West London

  1. Barnes Bridge railway station is in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, in south west London, and is in Travelcard Zone 3.
  2. The Beverley Brook is a minor tributary of the River Thames in south west London.

Canary Wharf

  1. What was formerly the Millennium Dome, located by the Thames to the east of Canary Wharf, is now used as an entertainment venue known as The O 2. (Web site)
  2. This 4-star hotel looks out over the River Thames to Canary Wharf. (Web site)

Greenwich

  1. Faulting and folding brings the chalk close to the surface just south of the Thames in Lewisham and Greenwich. (Web site)
  2. Near its confluence with the Thames, north-east of Deptford town centre (and west of Greenwich), the tidal reach of the river is known as Deptford Creek.
  3. Its confluence with the Thames is in Greenwich Reach, north-east of Deptford town centre and downstream of the A2 (and west of Greenwich).

Croydon

  1. Of the 33 London boroughs, only Kingston, Bexley, Bromley, Sutton and Croydon - all south of the Thames - have no Underground stations. (Web site)
  2. With 28 locks grouped into two flights, and numerous swing bridges, the canal linked the Thames to Croydon via Forest Hill, Sydenham, and Anerley.

River Wandle

  1. The Wandle Trail connects at East Croydon to link along the river Wandle via Morden to the Thames at Wandsworth.
  2. The River Wandle is a major tributary of the River Thames, where it stretches to Wandsworth and Putney for 9 miles (14 km) from its main source in Croydon. (Web site)
  3. Wandsworth is actually named after the River Wandle, which flows into the River Thames on the Tideway at Wandsworth. (Web site)

Barges

  1. The wheel was constructed in sections which were floated up the Thames on barges and assembled lying flat on piled platforms in the river. (Web site)
  2. Barges were needed to move many other raw materials and finished goods into the Thames and to London and beyond. (Web site)

Navigable

  1. As regards watercommunications, the Thames is navigable for large launches to Oxford, and for barges over the whole of its Oxfordshire course. (Web site)
  2. Except the Thames none of the rivers in the county is continuously navigable. (Web site)
  3. Some were anciently navigable, notably the Severn, Thames, and Trent.

Southern England

  1. The Thames Estuary is part of Thames Gateway, designated as one of the principal development areas in Southern England.
  2. Reading is an important commercial centre in Southern England and is often referred to as the commercial capital of the Thames Valley. (Web site)
  3. The River Thames is a major river flowing through southern England.

Estuary

  1. Below the barrier, the river passes Dartford, Tilbury and Gravesend before entering the Thames Estuary near Southend-on-Sea.
  2. Below Teddington Lock (about upstream of the Thames Estuary) the river is subject to tidal activity from the North Sea.
  3. Conrad also gives a memorable description of the approach to London from the Thames Estuary in his essays The Mirror of the Sea (1906).

Severn

  1. This was to be part of the Grand Cross, a scheme to link the four rivers Trent, Mersey, Severn and Thames. (Web site)
  2. He and Robert Mylne surveyed a line for a canal from Bristol to join the Thames & Severn near Cirencester.
  3. The large cavity under the cill is found on all of the locks on the upper reaches of the Thames and Severn.

Rowing

  1. View of River Thames from Limehouse on an Autumn Evening The Thames is the historic heartland of rowing in the United Kingdom. (Web site)
  2. Other regattas, head races and bumping races are held along the Thames which are described under Rowing on the River Thames.
  3. Rowing on the river is generally organised through clubs based on the Thames, which include the following. (Web site)

Henley

  1. Henley has been described a the Mecca of rowing on the Thames.
  2. The River Thames is a short walk away and Henley on Thames a short drive.
  3. For the more relaxed visitor to the Thames Valley, the popular tourist centres of Windsor, Henley, Cookham and Ascot are all within easy reach. (Web site)

Wharves

  1. Right next to Tower Bridge's north pier (so on the north side of the Thames, surrounded by wharves and more modern buildings), are St. Katherine's Docks.
  2. Scheduled boat services operate on the Thames, operating from wharves on the Reading side of the river near Caversham Bridge.
  3. It also extended its remit slightly further eastwards to include the docks and wharves of St Katharine Docks and Shad Thames. (Web site)

Shad Thames

  1. The area where the Neckinger meets the Thames at St Saviour's Dock was historically known as Jacob's Island (now the wealthy area known as Shad Thames).
  2. Shad Thames is a picturesque and historic riverside street next to Tower Bridge in south London, UK, and is also an informal name for the surrounding area. (Web site)
  3. The Anchor Brewhouse was a small brewery on the junction of Shad Thames and Horselydown Lane, by Tower Bridge in London.

Kent

  1. Kent (30). A county in southeastern England located between the Strait of Dover on the south and southeast and the Thames estuary on the north.
  2. Kent has land borders with East Sussex, Surrey and Greater London, and a defined boundary with Essex in the middle of the Thames estuary.
  3. The Romans invaded England in 43 AD. They landed in Kent, made their way to the River Thames and sailed up it.

Gravesend

  1. The Thames and Medway Canal is a disused canal in Kent, south east England, also known as the Gravesend and Rochester Canal.
  2. Between 1799 and 1803 he attempted to drive a tunnel beneath the Thames between Tilbury and Gravesend.
  3. Despite the road crossing to Dartford in Kent across the River Thames, a pedestrian ferry to Gravesend still operates from Tilbury during limited hours. (Web site)

Southern Bank

  1. It joins the Thames near Lechlade from the southern bank on the reach above Buscot Lock.
  2. From the LSWR Waterloo approaches, the WEL&CPR was also to construct a branch to an independent terminus in Battersea, on the southern bank of the Thames.
  3. It is situated in the London Borough of Bexley, close to the southern bank of the River Thames, to the east of Thamesmead, and north-west of Erith.

Thames River

  1. The Thames River continues west into the Cotswolds and the last navigable point on the river is at Lechlade. (Web site)
  2. The River Thames in England, United Kingdom, sometimes mistakenly called the "Thames River" by people from abroad.
  3. The Thames river provided the major highway between London and Westminster in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Legoland

  1. Conveniently situated on the scenic banks of the River Thames, ideal for Windsor, Legoland and within easy reach of Central London. (Web site)

Central London

  1. It is strategically located just 11 miles south of Central London and is within close proximity of Croydon, Kingston upon Thames, Mitcham and Epsom.
  2. Just 10 miles from central London, the house is surrounded by its own parkland landscaped by Capability Brown, and Kew Gardens is just across the Thames. (Web site)
  3. The walk along the South Bank of the Thames is a relaxing walk through central London, away (albeit only a short distance) from the traffic.

Staines

  1. The main centres of population served by the hospital are Woking, Weybridge, Chertsey, Staines and Walton on Thames.
  2. The tidal section Main article: Tideway London Stone at Staines, built in 1285 marked the tidal limit of the Thames and the City of London 's jurisdiction.
  3. It was named after Staines, which bordered it to the west, and surrounded Sunbury on Thames on two sides. (Web site)

North Bank

  1. Most of Staines is on the north bank of the Thames, across which there has been a bridge since Roman times (hence the Roman name of the town Pontes). (Web site)
  2. The Tower of London is a group of buildings and towers covering 13 acres along the north bank of the Thames. (Web site)
  3. London was founded on the north bank of the Thames and, for many centuries, there was only a single bridge, London Bridge. (Web site)

Thames Valley

  1. The Knoll is situated in the heart of the Thames Valley in the quiet village of Shiplake just two miles from Henley on Thames. (Web site)
  2. Reading's location in the Thames Valley to the west of London has made the town an important location in the nation's transport system. (Web site)
  3. Starting in London and heading upstream along the Thames Valley on the M4 you'll come to the twin towns of Eton and Windsor.

Windsor

  1. Located on the scenic banks of the Thames, this hotel is ideal for Windsor, Legoland, Ascot Racecourse and London.
  2. Instead the town of Windsor was joined with Eton and part of Slough north of the Thames. (Web site)
  3. A walk along the riverside offers amazing views of the Thames and great walks towards the villages of Cookham, Marlow; Bray and Windsor and Eton.

Route

  1. This is true of the River Thames and as it flows into the west of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead it matures and widens on its route to London.
  2. Alongside the river runs the Thames Path, providing a route for walkers and cyclists.
  3. However, the only route to London was via the Oxford Canal to the River Thames at Oxford, and then down the river to the capital. (Web site)

Thames Path

  1. The Thames Path now left the river, passing through Shiplake, as there was no right of way along the riverbank. (Web site)
  2. Follow the Thames path to Richmond upon Thames, Kew (home of the botanical gardens) and beyond into Barnes and Putney. (Web site)
  3. Around the year 2000 AD, several footbridges were added along the Thames, either as part of the Thames Path or in commemoration of the Millennium.

Teddington

  1. Head down the Thames to Teddington, then cruise a short stretch of the Tideway and into the barge canals of London. (Web site)
  2. For instance, although the Thames above Teddington (England) is almost entirely a leisure waterway, the locks are usually staffed. (Web site)
  3. As a result, there are four lifeboat stations on the Thames based at Teddington, Chiswick Pier, Tower Pier and Gravesend.

Teddington Lock

  1. Downstream from Teddington Lock, the Thames is subject to tides and is known as the Tideway. (Web site)
  2. Kingston Bridge is on the reach above Teddington Lock and close to and downstream of the mouth of the Hogsmill River, a minor tributary of the Thames.
  3. Critics claimed it would make the Thames, a tidal river below Teddington lock, more hazardous to travel on.

Woolwich

  1. It spans 520 metres (a third of a mile) across the Thames at Woolwich, where it protects London from tidal flooding. (Web site)
  2. The worst accident on the Thames took place in 1878 near Woolwich, south-east London.
  3. Earlier in the century, proposals for a flood barrier included a dam across the Thames in Gravesend and a dam in Woolwich.

Thames Barrier

  1. In 1974, a decade of work began on the construction of the Thames Barrier across the Thames at Woolwich to deal with this threat. (Web site)
  2. Richmond to the Thames Barrier (28 miles – 45 km): through London, using parkland (e.g., Battersea Park) to continue beside the river.
  3. At Woolwich in south-east London the river is intercepted by the Thames Barrier (020-8305 4188), the largest movable flood barrier in the world.

Categories

  1. Settlements > Cities > Capitals > London
  2. Liquids > Water > Rivers > River
  3. Countries > United Kingdom > England > Oxford
  4. Culture > Architecture > Construction > Bridge
  5. Lock

Related Keywords

    * Area * Bank * Banks * Berkshire * Boat * Boating * Boats * Borough * Bridge * Bridges * Canal * Canals * Crossing * Crossings * East * England * First Bridge * Gloucestershire * Hampton Court * Hotel * Kingston * Lock * Locks * London * London Bridge * Maidenhead * Mile * Miles * Navigation * North * Oxford * Reading * Richmond * River * Rivers * River Thames * Royal Borough * Severn Canal * South * South Bank * Thames Bridge * Thames Tunnel * Town * Tributaries * Tributary * Tunnel
  1. Books about "Thames" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Thames"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: June 16, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0222 sec. a=1..