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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Thought > Value   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MORAL VALUE
VALUE SYSTEM
VALUES
INTRINSIC
ECOSYSTEM
INTRINSIC VALUE
INDIVIDUALISM
JUDGMENT
COMMUNAL VALUE
ULTIMATE
PLURALISM
REALIZATION
VALUE-PLURALISM
RESOLVE
GREATER VALUE
DEPENDS UPON
SURVIVALISTS
UNITS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Value"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. A value is an object of goal-directed action.
  2. Value is a relational phenomenon and any particular thing’s value reflects its bearing on a specific individual’s life.
  3. A value is an object of action.
  4. Value is a teleological concept, he reasons, and for living organisms, the teleological is biological.
  5. Value is a matter of decision, a matter of will.

Moral Value

  1. It stands as a compromise between moral absolutism, and moral relativism, where situational human factors, like culture, dictate moral value.
  2. Ayn Rand's defense of Life as the ultimate standard of moral value is more elegant and powerful.
  3. He thought of moral value as a unique and universally identifiable property.

Value System

  1. Those who hold to their idealized value system and claim no exceptions (other than the default) are called absolutists.
  2. A value system refers to how an individual or a group of individuals organize their ethical or ideological values.
  3. Value System: the ways in which we organize, rank, prioritize, and make decisions based on our values.

Values

  1. This argument claims that our motivation is egoistic and our value commitments are hedonistic.
  2. For simplicity of expression, its points are made in ‘value’ terminology.
  3. Normative hedonism that includes an extrinsic experience account cannot recognize value in such experience.
  4. If there is not, then Williams has not shown that morality competes with, or is trumped by, some other value.
  5. And so on. In embedded contexts, this secondary component becomes the semantic value of the embedded moral expression.

Intrinsic

  1. This end must be intrinsically valuable, for it is its intrinsic value that imposes obligation to will it.
  2. Monistic theories of value assert that there is exactly one intrinsic good, from which all other goods are instrumental.
  3. AX1: intrinsic value is assigned to the pleasure that accompanies the experienced fulfilment of intrinsic preferences (cf.
  4. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically.

Ecosystem

  1. Shallow ecologists feel that the ecosystem's value does not reach beyond our appreciation of it.
  2. This sort of holism seems an odd point of view: in our experience goodness, or value exists within an ecosystem, Earth.

Intrinsic Value

  1. His empirical approach did not accept intrinsic value as an inherent or enduring property of things.
  2. The well-being and flourishing of human and nonhuman life on Earth have value in themselves (synonyms: intrinsic value, inherent value).
  3. In other words, Dewey claimed that anything can only be of intrinsic value if it is a contributory good.
  4. The obligation, then, must be founded in the intrinsic value of the end, that is, his well-being, or blessedness, and only conditioned upon merit.

Individualism

  1. An example conflict would be a value system based on individualism pitted against a value system based on collectivism.
  2. The more generalized the exception, the more useful it is in a wider context for defining a consistent value system.
  3. Some people call this hierarchical value system our "moral intuition," or our "moral instinct" -- what "feels right" is right (or ethical).
  4. Note that valuing the consistency of a value system is itself a sort of 'meta-value' that could be present or absent in a given value system.

Judgment

  1. In this sense, a value judgment is one formed by the specific values or value system held by the one asserting it.
  2. Take for example our aesthetic judgments of value.
  3. If the economist states the outcome of his investigation by saying that a is a bad measure, he does not pronounce a judgment of value.

Communal Value

  1. As a member of a society, group or community, an individual can hold both a personal value system and a communal value system at the same time.
  2. Some communal value systems can take the form of legal codes or law.

Ultimate

  1. All must converge on an ultimate value.
  2. An ultimate value is sought for its own sake and for the sake of which we pursue everything else.
  3. Man-s life is the ultimate value and the standard of value for a human being.
  4. It has been shown that neither of these can be an ultimate good and impose obligation to choose itself as an ultimate end, or for its intrinsic value.

Pluralism

  1. Value-pluralism differs from value-relativism in that pluralism accepts limits to differences, such as when vital human needs are violated.
  2. The idea of value pluralism, of goods as not merely plural and conflicting but incommensurable, answers to this experience.

Realization

  1. The organized realization of value implies the solidarity of humanity.
  2. The aspects interpenetrate; they are complementary to each other in one life-process, the successful realization of which is recognized as value.

Value-Pluralism

  1. Joseph Raz and many others have done further work clarifying and defending value-pluralism.
  2. An important critique of value-pluralism has been advanced by the philosopher Charles Blattberg, who was a student of Berlin's.
  3. Another notable critic of value-pluralism in recent times is Ronald Dworkin, who attempts to forge a liberal theory of equality from a monist starting-point.

Resolve

  1. A rational value system organized to resolve the conflict between two such value systems might take the form below.
  2. This section is devoted to the process of using rational analysis to resolve conflicts between value systems.

Greater Value

  1. This preference indicates greater value.
  2. Objectivism uses this term in a special sense: a "sacrifice", according to its Objectivist definition, is the giving up of a greater value for a lesser one.

Depends Upon

  1. For Rand, the concept of value depends upon and is derived from the antecedent concept of life.
  2. As de Roover wrote of Aquinas, "These passages are clear and unambiguous; value depends upon utility, usefulness, or human wants.

Survivalists

  1. Survivalists (Will Thomas, Eyal Mozes, David Kelley) accept Rand's theories of life as the standard of value.
  2. The Survivalists interpret "man qua man" (man qua rational organism) to mean that rationality is of great instrumental value to survival.

Units

  1. The number of units of value in both the A-history and the B-history is aleph-zero.
  2. This number is the number of the union of the units of value at each of the infinitely many times.

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Thought
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature
  4. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society
  5. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Systems

Subcategories

Everything
Values
Value System
  1. Books about "Value" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Value"
  Originally created: October 25, 2007.
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