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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Luster > Vitreous   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CALCIUM MAGNESIUM SILICATE
VITREOUS CAVITY
VITREOUS FLUID
VITREOUS BODY
VITREOUS HEMORRHAGE
GRAY
EYES
BACK
BLEEDING
PROCEDURE
BLUE
METAL
STRANDS
BLACK
MINERAL
GREEN
COLORLESS
STREAK
GEL
LIGHT
LENS
CRYSTALS
VESSELS
LEAK
WEATHERED
SALT SOLUTION
ANTERIOR SEGMENT
CILIARY BODY
PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY
VITRECTOMY
CARTILAGE
BLINDNESS
FLOATERS
RESINOUS
ADAMANTINE
PEARLY
DETACHMENT
BLOOD VESSELS
DIABETIC RETINOPATHY
VISION
WAXY
TRANSPARENT
OPAQUE
PEARLY LUSTER
SILKY
EYE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Vitreous"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The vitreous is a gel-like substance that fills the eye and is connected to the retina, optic nerve and many blood vessels.
  2. Blood in the vitreous, the clear gel-like substance that fills the inside of the eye, blocks light rays from reaching the retina.

Calcium Magnesium Silicate

  1. The fibrous material may be a calcium magnesium silicate, and is preferably vitreous.

Vitreous Cavity

  1. These lenses move backward and forward in the eye and the optic deforms when subjected to an increase in vitreous cavity pressure.
  2. In PDR abnormal blood vessels begin to grow from the surface of the retina into the vitreous cavity.

Vitreous Fluid

  1. The researchers found high concentrations of MSG in the vitreous fluid, which bathes the retina.

Vitreous Body

  1. Imaging with proton nuclear magnetic resonance is a valuable new tool for studying the vitreous body of the eye.
  2. Its outer surface is in contact with the choroid; its inner with the hyaloid membrane of the vitreous body.

Vitreous Hemorrhage

  1. Vitreous hemorrhage (bleed) - a new blood vessel bleeds into the vitreous (gel substance in the eye), blocking light to the retina.

Gray

  1. It forms brittle, tabular, and prismatic crystals with vitreous luster, pale yellow or gray color, good basal cleavage, and slightly salty taste.

Eyes

  1. The implants were placed in the vitreous of the eyes through a sclerotomy 1 cm posterior to the limbus in the dorso-temporal quadrant of the eye.

Back

  1. As a result new fragile blood vessels can begin to grow in the retina and into the vitreous, the gel-like fluid that fills the back of the eye.

Bleeding

  1. If left untreated, Proliferative Retinopathy may lead to bleeding into the Vitreous and Retinal Detachment with profound vision loss.
  2. These fragile vessels are prone to rupturing and bleeding into the vitreous body, causing blurred vision and possibly temporary blindness.

Procedure

  1. The procedure has a relatively high rate of complications due to the large incision required and pressure placed on the vitreous body.

Blue

  1. Dalton supposed that his vitreous humor was tinted blue, selectively absorbing longer wavelengths.

Metal

  1. Enamel In its simplest terms, all enamel is produced by fusing colored powdered glass to metal to produce a vitreous or glass-like, decorative surface.

Strands

  1. Symptoms of a vitreous hemorrhage usually include the appearance of spots, strands, or a curtain in the vision.

Black

  1. The color of amorphous selenium is either red, in powder form, or black, in vitreous form.

Mineral

  1. Lepidolite - Pink to purple in color with a vitreous to pearly luster, lepidolite can be quite a beautiful mineral.
  2. Kieserite is a mineral made of magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ·H 2 O). It has a vitreous luster and it is colourless, greyish-white or yellowish.

Green

  1. The different colors of the mineral, caused by impurities, include various reds, yellow, blue, green, brown, and black, luster is vitreous.

Colorless

  1. Glassy nepheline has the form of small, colorless, transparent crystals and grains with a vitreous luster.

Streak

  1. Black (schorl), blue (indicolite), pink and red (rubellite), brown (dravite), green, multicolored, rarely white; vitreous; streak white.

Gel

  1. They grow along the retina and along the surface of the clear, vitreous gel that fills the inside of the eye.

Light

  1. After passing through the vitreous humor, light falls on the retina, the interior lining of the back of the eye.

Lens

  1. The space behind it is filled with vitreous humor, which is optically denser than the glacial humor occupying the lens.
  2. Posterior to the lens is the vitreous body, which, along with the aqueous humor on the anterior surface, bathes the lens.

Crystals

  1. Hardness: 5 Bakerite Luster is vitreous as crystals; dull to sub-vitreous (porcelaneous) for nodules and masses.
  2. The crystals of peridot have a vitreous lustre and conchoidal fracture.

Vessels

  1. These new vessels bleed into the vitreous, blocking light from reaching the retina and causing vision to become cloudy.
  2. These new vessels are weak and can leak blood, blocking vision, which is a condition called vitreous hemorrhage.

Leak

  1. However, these fragile vessels can hemorrhage easily, and blood may leak into the retina and the clear, gel-like vitreous that fills inside of the eye.

Weathered

  1. Luster is vitreous to dull if weathered.
  2. Hardness: 1.5 to 2.5 Anorthite Luster is vitreous to dull if weathered.

Salt Solution

  1. A surgical treatment where an ophthalmologist removes the vitreous gel and replaces it with a salt solution.

Anterior Segment

  1. As ANTERIOR SEGMENT is defined all the former structures to vitreous.

Ciliary Body

  1. It passes from the two free surfaces of the ciliary body into the posterior aqueous, and into the vitreous, chambers.

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

  1. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the vitreous of eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
  2. Hepatocyte growth factor in vitreous fluid of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and other retinal disorders.

Vitrectomy

  1. During a vitrectomy, the retina surgeon carefully removes blood and vitreous from the eye, and replaces it with clear salt solution (saline).

Cartilage

  1. Type II, type IX, and type XI collagen are components of vitreous, cartilage, and other connective tissues.
  2. It is most clearly seen in cartilage, in the vitreous humour of the eye, and in the Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord.

Blindness

  1. Diabetes affects the lens, vitreous, and retina, causing visual symptoms causing visual blurring and blindness.
  2. Either of these serious problems, vitreous hemorrhage or traction retinal detachment, can lead to severe loss of vision or even total blindness.

Floaters

  1. Blood may leak into the retina and vitreous, causing spots or floaters, along with decreased vision.

Resinous

  1. The mineral’s luster is categorized as vitreous (glass-like) or resinous (amber-like).

Adamantine

  1. Luster is vitreous to adamantine or pitchy when more massive.

Pearly

  1. Luster: (In crystals) Adamantine to vitreous, but pearly on cleavage.
  2. Hardness: 3.2 to 3.4 Clinoptilolite Luster is vitreous to pearly on the most prominent pinacoid face and on cleavage surfaces.

Detachment

  1. The surgeon may also gently cut strands of vitreous that are attached to the retina and could lead to retinal tears or detachment.

Blood Vessels

  1. As the blood vessels weaken, they may leak fluid or blood into the clear vitreous mass that fills the eye, or become enlarged, damaging the delicate retina.
  2. Fragile, new blood vessels grow along the retina and in the clear, gel-like vitreous that fills the inside of the eye.
  3. In addition, the new blood vessels may bleed, adding the further complication of preretinal or vitreous hemorrhage.

Diabetic Retinopathy

  1. The effect of diabetes on the retina and vitreous is called diabetic retinopathy.
  2. Renin, prorenin, and immunoreactive renin in vitreous fluid from eyes with and without diabetic retinopathy.

Vision

  1. If blood clouds the vitreous, light passing from the lens through the vitreous to the retina is blocked, and vision is markedly reduced.
  2. This procedure can restore vision that has been obscured in the vitreous, however, any vision loss due to retinal damage or detachment is not restored.
  3. Surgical removal of the vitreous gel (vitrectomy) may also help improve vision if the retina has not been severely damaged.

Waxy

  1. Luster is earthy to dull or vitreous and waxy.
  2. Hardness: 4 Coconinoite Luster is vitreous or waxy to dull or earthy.

Transparent

  1. Hauynite is transparent to translucent mineral, and it has a vitreous or greasy luster.

Opaque

  1. The minerals are typically opaque and dark green to black in color with a vitreous to dull luster.
  2. It is transparent to opaque and has a vitreous to adamantine luster.

Pearly Luster

  1. Muscovite, the commoner variety, is usually colorless, but it may be red, yellow, green, brown, or gray, with a vitreous to pearly luster.
  2. Feldspars exhibit uneven fracture, and have a vitreous to pearly luster.
  3. Hardness: 5.5 to 6 Brucite Luster is vitreous or waxy; cleavage surfaces have a pearly luster.

Silky

  1. Lustre is vitreous to dull or silky in fibrous forms.

Eye

  1. Light enters the eye and is focused by the lens through the transparent gel-like fluid (vitreous) onto the retina.
  2. The surgeon makes a small incision in the eye before removing the vitreous that exists in front of the retina (where the blood gathers).
  3. Finally, light passes through another fluid-filled chamber in the center of the eye (the vitreous) and strikes the back of the eye, the retina.

Categories

  1. Luster
  2. Retina
  3. Hardness
  4. Dull
  5. Greasy

Related Keywords

    * Cornea * Dull * Eyeball * Glass * Glassy * Greasy * Hardness * Luster * Lustre * Retina * Specific Gravity * Translucent * Vitreous Luster
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  Short phrases about "Vitreous"
  Originally created: July 31, 2008.
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