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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Apatite > Zircon   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
VARIABLE PROPERTIES
COMMON MINERALS
TRADITIONAL BIRTHSTONE
FUJIMAKI
GLOWING TREE
HAFNIUM
IRON OXIDE
BILLION YEARS OLD
RADIOMETRIC DATING
SPY SATELLITE
JACINTH
LARGE ZIRCON CRYSTALS
DETRITAL ZIRCON
ZIRCONIUM SILICATE
EPIDOTE
CASSITERITE
FACETS
LUSTER
ONESELF
MIDDLE AGES
RICHES
BLUE
COMMON
SYNTHETIC
NATURAL
BYPRODUCT
JEWELRY
BROWN
WEARER
SANDS
COLORS
DIFFERENT COLORS
ASSOCIATED
IGNEOUS ROCKS
PRESENT
SULFIDES
ROCKS
OPAL
DIAMOND
DIAMONDS
THORIUM
FLUORITE
CHLORITE
REFRACTIVE INDEX
PERIDOT
COLORLESS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Zircon"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Zircon is a natural mineral, zirconium silicate, and is found in a range of colors, including white, blue, yellow, orange, brown, rose and green.
  2. Zircon (including hyacinth or yellow zircon) is a mineral belonging to the group of nesosilicates. (Web site)
  3. Zircon is a common and widespread accessory mineral in all types of igneous rocks and detrital deposits derived from these rocks.
  4. Zircon is a coproduct or byproduct of the mining and processing of heavy-mineral sands for the titanium minerals, ilmenite and rutile, or tin minerals.
  5. Zircon (from Persian: sarkun, golden) is a mineral belonging to the group of nesosilicates.

Variable Properties

  1. This partially disrupts the crystal structure and explains the highly variable properties of zircon. (Web site)

Common Minerals

  1. The letters in ZTR stand for 3 common minerals found in ultra-weathered sediments: Zircon, Tourmaline, and Rutile.

Traditional Birthstone

  1. Zircon is regarded as the traditional birthstone for December.

Fujimaki

  1. Fujimaki, H. (1986). Partition coefficients of Hf, Zr, and REE between zircon, apatite, and liquid. (Web site)

Glowing Tree

  1. Hindu poets tell of the Kalpa Tree, the ultimate gift to the gods, a glowing tree covered in gemstone fruit with leaves of zircon. (Web site)

Hafnium

  1. Hafnium is found widely distributed in nature, usually in association with zirconium minerals such as zircon.

Iron Oxide

  1. Heavy accessory minerals (tourmaline and zircon) are not coated with iron oxide, and are not etched, as are most of the quartz grains.

Billion Years Old

  1. The oldest object to be discovered on Earth is a tiny grain of Zircon, 4.3 billion years old. (Web site)

Radiometric Dating

  1. The pervasive occurrence of zircon has become more important since the discovery of radiometric dating.

Spy Satellite

  1. Zircon For the spy satellite of this codename see Zircon (satellite). (Web site)

Jacinth

  1. J [ top] Jacinth - Jacinth is a red transparent variety of zircon used as a gemstone. (Web site)
  2. Stone's names: The orange variety of zircon is called jacinth.

Large Zircon Crystals

  1. Large zircon crystals are seldom abundant.

Detrital Zircon

  1. Zircon grains in the Jack Hills, Narryer Terrane have been dated at ~4.27 Ga, with one detrital zircon dated as old as 4.4 Ga. (Web site)

Zirconium Silicate

  1. Description: ZrSiO 4 Zircon is a silicate mineral, zirconium silicate.

Epidote

  1. Heavy mineral spectra contain chrome spinel, glaucophane, chloritoid, epidote, and garnet, as well as zircon, tourmaline, and rutile. (Web site)

Cassiterite

  1. Cassiterite, ilmenite, zircon and rutile are lighter heavy minerals which are distributed in a broader variety of depositional settings. (Web site)

Facets

  1. Round stones are often given a "zircon" cut which is similar to a standard round brilliant cut with an extra tier of facets at the culet. (Web site)

Luster

  1. The lost of luster on a Zircon stone is said to warn of danger.

Oneself

  1. Mystical power: Zircon supposedly helps one be more at peace with oneself.

Middle Ages

  1. In the middle ages, zircon was said to aid sleep, bring prosperity, and promote honor and wisdom in its owner. (Web site)

Riches

  1. In the Middle Ages, zircon was thought to induce sleep, promote riches, honor, wisdom, and drive away plagues and evil spirits. (Web site)

Blue

  1. Blue zircon can be found in a range of blue tones from very pale to a saturated medium blue.

Common

  1. The formation of metamorphic zircon by solid-state recrystallization is probably common to high-grade terranes worldwide. (Web site)

Synthetic

  1. Finch and Hanchar (Chapter 1) review the structure of zircon and other mineral (and synthetic) phases with the zircon structure.
  2. Unfortunately, many consumers suffer from a strange misconception that zircon is a synthetic or artificial stones, rather than a natural creation.
  3. In addition to this, the use of zircon as a cheap diamond rip-off has led many people to believe that zircon is synthetic or some kind of fake.

Natural

  1. Semi-Precious Stones: Natural zircon, white topaz and white sapphire. (Web site)

Byproduct

  1. Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam also produce Zircon as a byproduct of corundum mining. (Web site)

Jewelry

  1. From the stone history: Zircon has been around in jewelry for hundreds of years.

Brown

  1. But not all brown zircon will turn blue when heated; only some zircon has the right physical structure to turn blue when heated.
  2. Blue zircon, the most popular color, is produced by heat treatment of brown zircon.

Wearer

  1. Zircon is believed to provide the wearer with wisdom, honor and riches. (Web site)
  2. During the Middle Ages, zircon was believed to contain remedial power, protecting the wearer from diseases and banishing insomnia. (Web site)

Sands

  1. Sands currently used in steel mill ladles are mostly silica, zircon and chromite based.

Colors

  1. Zircon stone is very bright as in many beautiful colors.

Different Colors

  1. The name probably comes from the Persian word 'zargun', which means 'gold-colored', although zircon comes in a wide range of different colors. (Web site)

Associated

  1. Quartz is associated most commonly with Aegirine and Potassium Feldspar, as well as Zircon. (Web site)
  2. The Ageririne is often associated with small white Microcline Feldspar crystals or beige doubly terminated Zircon crystals. (Web site)

Igneous Rocks

  1. Zircon a mineral that is a common accessory phase in all types of igneous rocks. (Web site)

Present

  1. Zircon, apatite and magnetite are always present in rhyolites, their crystals being often beautifully perfect though never large. (Web site)

Sulfides

  1. The presence and relative abundance of accessory minerals such as oxides, sulfides, apatite, and zircon are noted. (Web site)

Rocks

  1. Recent testing of a zircon, at 4.4 billion years old the world's oldest rock, suggests rocks which formed at temperatures low enough for liquid water. (Web site)

Opal

  1. Thailand is rich in precious stones, with a natural abundance of rubies, sapphires, zircon, onyx, jade and opal. (Web site)

Diamond

  1. Some translucent stones include diamond, zircon, emerald, rock crystal, and ruby. (Web site)
  2. The zircon is as brilliant as the diamond, yet not precious. (Web site)
  3. Zircon can be distinguished from diamond by it's double refraction and by wear and tear of it's edges, as compared to diamond which is very much harder.

Diamonds

  1. Zircon resembles diamond in luster and fire and colorless zircons have been mistaken for diamonds by experienced jewelers. (Web site)
  2. Zircon is the most brilliant of all colored gemstone (only thus could it be misused as an imitation for diamonds).

Thorium

  1. The difference between the two types results from the decay of uranium and thorium that are naturally present in zircon. (Web site)

Fluorite

  1. Actinolite, albite, apatite grp., biotite, cancrinite, catapleiite, corundum, fluorite, garbet grp., microcline, nepheline, sodalite, zircon.

Chlorite

  1. Smaller amounts of chlorite, epidote, zircon and apatite also occur. (Web site)

Refractive Index

  1. These two types of zircon are separated by their difference in refractive index and specific gravity. (Web site)

Peridot

  1. Calcite, peridot, zircon, tourmaline, and titanite are doubly-refractive stones.

Colorless

  1. The natural color of zircon varies between colorless, yellow-golden, red, brown, blue, and green. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Apatite
  2. Rutile
  3. Garnet
  4. Magnetite
  5. Ilmenite

Related Keywords

    * Accessory Mineral * Accessory Minerals * Anatase * Apatite * Aquamarine * Associated Minerals * Baddeleyite * Biotite * Columbite * Common Accessory Mineral * Common Accessory Minerals * Crystals * Crystal Structure * Cubic Zirconia * Diopside * Feldspars * Garnet * Gem * Gems * Gemstone * Gemstones * Heavy Minerals * Hessonite * High Refractive Index * Hornblende * Ilmenite * Inclusions * Kyanite * Leucoxene * Magnetite * Mica * Mineral * Minerals * Minor Amounts * Monazite * Nesosilicates * Quartz * Radiation Damage * Refractive Indices * Relatively Low Cost * Rutile * Sapphire * Sphene * Spinel * Stones * Tanzanite * Tetragonal System * Titanite * Titanium * Topaz * Tourmaline * Understudy * Vesuvianite * Western Australia * Yellow * Zirconium * Zirconium Oxide * Zircons
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  Short phrases about "Zircon"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: May 30, 2013.
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