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Zirconium       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Chemical Elements > Hafnium > Zirconium   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
BIOLOGICAL ROLE
ZIRCONIUM SILICATE
HALF
ZIRCONIA
PORCELAIN
EMBODIMENT
ACCESS
SURFACE
NATURE
NEUTRONS
MINERAL
SILICA
COMMERCIALLY
IMPLANT
MATERIAL
IDENTICAL
PROPERTIES
NUCLEAR POWER
CHEMISTS
ELEMENTS
OXIDE
LANTHANUM
BERYLLIUM
ALUMINUM
OXIDATION STATE
MIXTURE
POTASSIUM PERCHLORATE
ABUTMENT
CHEMICALLY
PERIODIC
COMPOUNDS
VANADIUM
HIGH TEMPERATURES
CORROSION
RECRYSTALLIZATION
METAL
ELEMENT
NIOBIUM
METALS
THORIUM
MINERALS
ZIRCON
TITANIUM
HAFNIUM
ZIRCONIUM
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Zirconium"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Zirconium is a fairly abundant element and is widely distributed in minerals, but it is never found uncombined in nature.
  2. Zirconium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Zr and atomic number 40.
  3. Zirconium is a white metal, and thus the porcelain that is fused to it does not have to be heavily opacified to hide the underlying metal.
  4. Zirconium is a grayish-white metal, lustrous, and quite corrosion-resistant. (Web site)
  5. Zirconium is a very strong, malleable, ductile, lustrous silver-gray metal.

Biological Role

  1. Zirconium has no biological role.

Zirconium Silicate

  1. Description: ZrSiO 4 Zircon is a silicate mineral, zirconium silicate.

Half

  1. About half of all hafnium metal manufactured is produced by a by-product of zirconium refinement.

Zirconia

  1. Baddeleyite is a rare zirconium oxide mineral (Zr O 2) or zirconia.
  2. Also known as CAD-CAM dental crowns, they are based on zirconium dioxide (zirconia). (Web site)

Porcelain

  1. The paste for the porcelain layer 14 is then applied to the inner surface of the zirconium oxide ceramic framework 11 and is left to completely dry. (Web site)

Embodiment

  1. In this embodiment, a zirconium layer can first be formed on the semiconductor wafer. (Web site)

Access

  1. However, based on Dr. Garcia's review of zirconium, you may now have access to a far better option if you need to have an entire tooth replaced.

Surface

  1. In one embodiment, the medical implant has a surface layer of oxidized zirconium of a thickness of up to about 10 microns. (Web site)
  2. The treated surface is then coated with a ceramic nitride material, such as titanium or zirconium nitride as described below. (Web site)

Nature

  1. Hafnium is found combined in natural zirconium compounds but does not exist as a free element in nature.

Neutrons

  1. While hafnium is very good at absorbing neutrons, zirconium hardly absorbs neutrons at all. (Web site)

Mineral

  1. Baddeleyite is a mineral that consists of zirconia (Zr O 2). Its melting point is 2700 ° C. Elemental zirconium is refined from baddeleyite.

Silica

  1. Its chemical behavior shows many similarities with that or silica and zirconium, as an element belonging to the first transition group.

Commercially

  1. It occurs in nature as the mineral zircon (zirconium silicate), from which it is obtained commercially.

Implant

  1. As with the implant, there are several types of cap, for example titanium and zirconium, and the price varies by as much as 100%.

Material

  1. After zirconium was chosen as material for the nuclear reactor program in the 1940s, a separation method had to be developed. (Web site)
  2. Straumann is the only company to offer an all-ceramic abutment made from the IPS e.max (zirconium dioxide) material. (Web site)

Identical

  1. Although their chemistry is almost identical, the density of zirconium is about half of hafnium.

Properties

  1. Its properties are extremely close to those of Zirconium, with the exception that Hafnium is twice as dense. (Web site)

Nuclear Power

  1. Thus a nearly-complete separation of zirconium and hafnium is necessary for their use in nuclear power.

Chemists

  1. Chemists later developed a better understanding about the relationship of zirconium and hafnium. (Web site)

Elements

  1. The properties of hafnium are markedly affected by zirconium impurities and these two elements are amongst the most difficult to separate.

Oxide

  1. The newest type of crown is one made with a zirconium oxide (zirconia) ceramic coping underlying a porcelain "veneer".
  2. The catalyst is prepared by treating zirconium hydroxide or zirconium oxide with a sulphate-radical-containing solution and heating. (Web site)
  3. Many systems use an aluminium oxide or zirconium oxide or zirconia core insteed of metal that makes complete porcelain restorations. (Web site)

Lanthanum

  1. Mendeleev's 1869 table had implicitly predicted a heavier analog of titanium and zirconium, but in 1871 he placed lanthanum in that spot.

Beryllium

  1. Inner Mongolia has more deposits of naturally-occurring niobium, zirconium and beryllium than any other province -level region in China. (Web site)

Aluminum

  1. Alkoxides of calcium, titanium, zirconium, magnesium, aluminum, iron and potassium also can be used. (Web site)
  2. A combination that yields a very durable wheel is zirconium oxide and aluminum, known as zircon alumina.

Oxidation State

  1. Zirconium zinc alloy becomes magnetic at temperatures below 35 K. Oxidation state of zirconium is usually +4, although +3 and +2 can also be obtained.
  2. Like zirconium, hafnium reacts with halogens forming the tetrahalogen compound with the oxidation state of +4 for hafnium.

Mixture

  1. The zirconium salt can also be a mixture of two or more species of organic zirconium salts including those of different numbers of acids per molecule. (Web site)

Potassium Perchlorate

  1. One of the most common initiators is ZPP, or zirconium - potassium perchlorate - a mixture of metallic zirconium and potassium perchlorate.
  2. ZHPP (zirconium hydride - potassium perchlorate) is a variant of ZPP that uses zirconium hydride instead of pure zirconium.

Abutment

  1. X-ray Confirmation: Successful Implant This is an immediate post operative x-ray taken showing the implant, zirconium abutment and temporary crown.
  2. The abutment can be titanium or it can also be zirconium, which is white if we're going to be in an aesthetic area.

Chemically

  1. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium.

Periodic

  1. Situated in Group 4 of the periodic table, it has properties similar to those of hafnium and zirconium. (Web site)
  2. Its chemical properties are almost identical to those of zirconium, the element directly above it in group IVb of the periodic table.

Compounds

  1. Sodium in its metallic form can be used to refine some reactive metals, such as zirconium and potassium, from their compounds.
  2. Today, chemists know that compounds of hafnium dissolve more easily in some liquids than do compounds of zirconium. (Web site)

Vanadium

  1. It is a high potential region for gold, PGE, chromite, titanium, vanadium, molybdenum, zirconium and kyanite (given the necessary exploration).

High Temperatures

  1. When it is finely divided into a powder, zirconium can spontaneously ignite in air, especially at high temperatures.

Corrosion

  1. Zirconium is extremely resistant to heat and corrosion.

Recrystallization

  1. Hafnium was separated from zirconium through repeated recrystallization of the double ammonium or potassium fluorides by Jantzen and von Hevesey. (Web site)

Metal

  1. Zirconium scrap stored with finely divided zirconium metal has been known to spontaneously ignite, causing fires with very high temperatures. (Web site)
  2. This metal is commercially produced by reduction of the Zirconium(IV) chloride with magnesium in the Kroll process, and through other methods.
  3. The oxide is reduced to metal by heating with lanthanum, aluminium, cerium or zirconium in high vacuum.

Element

  1. Zirconium Facts Learn about the chemical and physical properties and other characteristics of the element zirconium.
  2. Its chemical properties are almost identical to those of zirconium, the element directly above it in Group 4 of the periodic table. (Web site)
  3. Small amounts of the element (0.1 to 0.2%) have been used to reduce grain size of chromium, molybdenum, titanium, and zirconium.

Niobium

  1. Common impurities include magnesium, aluminium, calcium, zirconium, niobium, and tantalum.

Metals

  1. It can be alloyed with small quantities of other metals, such as aluminum, manganese, zinc and zirconium, to obtain desired properties.
  2. Metals tend to be rather transparent to neutrons, aluminum and zirconium being the two best examples of this.

Thorium

  1. Reducing agent in the extraction of other metals such as uranium, zirconium, and thorium.
  2. Calcium is a soft grey alkaline earth metal that is used as a reducing agent in the extraction of thorium, zirconium and uranium.
  3. Other important mineral resources include iron ore, chromium, tin, zinc, lead, thorium, zirconium, vanadium, antimony, and beryllium.

Minerals

  1. A lustrous, silvery gray, tetravalent transition metal, hafnium chemically resembles zirconium and is found in zirconium minerals. (Web site)
  2. Hafnium is found widely distributed in nature, usually in association with zirconium minerals such as zircon.
  3. A lustrous, silvery gray tetravalent transition metal, hafnium resembles zirconium chemically and is found in zirconium minerals.

Zircon

  1. Minerals that contain zirconium, such as alvite [(Hf, Th, Zr) Si O 4 H 2 O], thortveitite, and zircon (ZrSiO 4), usually contain between 1 and 5% hafnium.
  2. Zirconium and hafnium are contained in zircon at a ratio of about 50 to 1 and are difficult to separate.
  3. Zirconium oxide (zircon) has a high index of refraction and is used as a gem material.

Titanium

  1. Zirconia is the dioxide of zirconium, a metal close to titanium in the periodic table and with similar biocompatability properties. (Web site)
  2. And trace amounts of copper, strontium, titanium, manganese, sodium, vanadium, boron and zirconium.
  3. Preferably, Me is a Group IVB metal, more preferably is titanium, zirconium or hafnium and, most preferably is zirconium. (Web site)

Hafnium

  1. The two elements are among the most difficult to separate—zirconium is almost always an impurity in hafnium and affects its physical properties. (Web site)
  2. A notable physical difference between them is their density (zirconium is about half as dense as hafnium), but chemically the elements are extremely similar.
  3. Of all the elements, zirconium and hafnium are two of the most difficult to separate. (Web site)

Zirconium

  1. Hafnium is a shiny silvery, ductile metal that is corrosion resistant and chemically similar to zirconium.
  2. More preferably, the catalyst contains copper oxide and an oxide of at least one element selected from zinc, magnesium, aluminum, chromium, and zirconium. (Web site)
  3. A lustrous gray-white, strong transition metal that resembles titanium, zirconium is obtained chiefly from zircon and is very corrosion resistant.

Categories

  1. Nature > Chemistry > Chemical Elements > Hafnium
  2. Zircon
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Information > Science > Titanium
  4. Thorium
  5. Chemical Properties
  6. Books about "Zirconium" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Zirconium"
  Originally created: May 07, 2008.
  Links checked: February 05, 2013.
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